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Coronavirus Politics Daily: Autocrats claim no cases, and Trump baits Maduro

Coronavirus Politics Daily: Autocrats claim no cases, and Trump baits Maduro

North Korea has zero coronavirus cases? North Korea claims to be one of few countries on earth with no coronavirus cases. But can we take the word of the notoriously opaque leadership at face value? Most long-term observers of Pyongyang dismiss as fanciful the notion that the North, which shares a border with China, its main trade partner, was able to avert the coronavirus pandemic sweeping the globe. Many point to Pyongyang's lack of testing capabilities as the real reason why it hasn't reported any COVID-19 cases. To be sure, Kim Jong-un, the North's totalitarian leader, imposed some of the strictest lockdown measures in the world, well before many other countries – closing the Chinese border and quarantining all diplomats. The state's ability to control its people and their movements would also make virus-containment efforts easier to manage. We might not know the truth for some time. But what is clear is that decades of seclusion and crippling economic sanctions have devastated North Korea's health system, raising concerns of its capacity to manage a widespread outbreak of disease.


Trump's overture to Venezuela: The Trump administration released a proposal Tuesday to ease US sanctions on Venezuela, but with a catch: it demands that long-time strongman Nicolas Maduro relinquish power to a transitional government made up of both regime loyalists and opposition figures. His rival, Juan Guaido, who heads Venezuela's parliament and is recognized as the country's legitimate leader by the US and most of the world's democracies, would also need to step aside – for now – in exchange for financial relief. The US hopes this would pave the way for fair national elections in the near-term in which Guaido could run for president. While Maduro's foreign minister came out and rejected this invitation to political suicide, President Trump is hoping that plummeting prices for oil, Venezuela's main export, will force Maduro to the bargaining table at a time when his government (and its wrecked healthcare system) badly needs resources to get through a growing coronavirus crisis of its own.

Word games in Turkmenistan: Not to be outdone by fellow former-Soviet strongman Alexsander Lukashenka's prescription of "vodka and saunas" as coronavirus antidote, the government of Turkmenistan, one of the most extravagantly repressive countries on earth, has taken a novel approach to fighting the novel coronavirus itself: don't say its name. According to Reporters Without Borders, the authorities in Ashgabat have largely discouraged state organs from referring to coronavirus or COVID-19, and official statistics show zero infections in the former Soviet Republic of nearly 6 million people. President Gurbanguly Berdymukhamedov, known abroad primarily for DJing, shooting guns while on a bicycle, and falling off his horse, has prescribed fumigating public areas – and nasal passages – with the smoke of the yuzarlik plant, though quarantines and lockdowns are reportedly gaining steam. Crazy as this all is, it's also very dangerous: Turkmenistan has a long border with Iran, which is home to one of the worst COVID-19 epidemics in the world. An outbreak in Turkmenistan, which is already reeling from a collapse in its lucrative gas exports to China, could quickly turn into a humanitarian catastrophe.

Carbon has a bad rep, but did you know it's a building block of life? As atoms evolved, carbon trapped in CO2 was freed, giving way to the creation of complex molecules that use photosynthesis to convert carbon to food. Soon after, plants, herbivores, and carnivores began populating the earth and the cycle of life began.

Learn more about how carbon created life on Earth in the second episode of Eni's Story of CO2 series.

On Tuesday night, you can finally watch Trump and Biden tangle on the debate stage. But you TOO can go head to head on debate night .. with your fellow US politics junkies.

Print out GZERO's handy debate BINGO cards and get ready to rumble. There are four different cards so that each player may have a unique board. Every time one of the candidates says one of these words or terms, X it on your card. First player to get five across wins. And if you really want to jazz it up, you can mark each of your words by taking a swig of your drink, or doing five burpees, or donating to your favorite charity or political candidate. Whatever gets you tipsy, in shape, or motivated, get the bingo cards here. It's fight night!

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Join us today, September 29th, at 11 am ET for a GZERO Town Hall livestream event, Ending the COVID-19 Pandemic, to learn about the latest in the global hunt for a COVID-19 vaccine.

Watch here at 11am ET: https://www.gzeromedia.com/events/town-hall-ending-the-covid-19-pandemic-livestream/

Our panel will discuss where things really stand on vaccine development, the political and economic challenges of distribution, and what societies need to be focused on until vaccine arrives in large scale. This event is the second in a series presented by GZERO Media in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Eurasia Group.

Apoorva Mandavilli, science & global health reporter for the New York Times, will moderate a conversation with:

  • Lynda Stuart, Deputy Director, Vaccines & Human Immunobiology, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • Rohitesh Dhawan, Managing Director, Energy, Climate & Resources, Eurasia Group
  • Mark Suzman, CEO, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • Gayle E. Smith, President & CEO, ONE Campaign and former Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development

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700,000: An additional 700,000 Syrian children may go hungry this year due to the combined effects of the war-ravaged country's economic implosion, as well as coronavirus restrictions, pushing the total number of food-insecure kids in Syria to over 4.6 million, according to Save the Children. Two thirds of surveyed children have not eaten any fresh fruit in three months.

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The long-simmering conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over a region called Nagorno-Karabakh erupted over the weekend, with more than 50 killed (so far) in the fiercest fighting in years. Will it escalate into an all-out war that threatens regional stability and drags in major outside players?

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