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Coronavirus Politics Daily: Informal workers in danger, Wisconsin’s omen, Brazil-China spats

Coronavirus Politics Daily: Informal workers in danger, Wisconsin’s omen, Brazil-China spats

The danger to informal workers grows: Coronavirus lockdowns have created a world of uncertainty for businesses and workers around the world. But one group of people that could be hit particularly hard are those working in the so-called "informal economy," where workers lack formal contracts, labor protections, or social safety nets. Nowhere is this challenge more widespread than in Africa, where a whopping 85 percent of the work force toils in the informal sector. These workers, which include street vendors, drivers, and the self-employed, don't have the luxury of working from home, which makes social distancing unviable. As a result, many continue to go to work, risking exposure to the virus, because not turning up is often the difference between putting food on the table and starving. What's more, even where governments are trying to provide support, many people lack bank accounts, complicating efforts to get them aid. In Nigeria, for example, some 60 percent of people do not even have a bank account, according to the World Bank.


COVID stirs fresh Brazil-China tensions: The coronavirus pandemic is stoking tensions between Brazil and its largest trading partner, China. Last month Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's son accused China's "dictatorship" of botching the initial outbreak response, drawing a sharp rebuke from Beijing. More recently, the beef has centered on medical equipment procurement. Last week, Brazil's Health Minister said China, the world's largest supplier, had cancelled several agreed-upon orders. Then Brazil's Education Minister (and close confidant of President Bolsonaro) accused China of using the pandemic to "dominate the world" and profiteer, in a tweet that also mocked Chinese pronunciation in Portuguese. He later deleted the post, but China's embassy in Brasilia promptly decried Brasilia's "racist" and "despicable" representation. For his part, President Bolsonaro has repeatedly dismissed the coronavirus threat, and evidently came close to firing his health minister (a trained doctor) over the issue. Now, as Brazil battles a surging number of COVID-19 cases, there's no hiding that his country of 212 million people needs medical supplies, and fast. Spats with China won't help.

As goes Wisconsin, so goes the nation? The US election will return to the news for about 10 minutes today as Wisconsin holds presidential primaries. Attention will be limited because former Vice President Joe Biden's near-insurmountable lead in national delegates has all but ended the race for the Democratic Party nomination — and because officials will not report any results until April 13. That will allow extra time for voters to file absentee ballots. But today's vote in Wisconsin offers a preview of the coming bitter national fight over the act of voting itself. Turnout today will be impacted by fears of COVID-19. Democrats and Republicans have fought over voting rules, and courts have intervened more than once. Results will be delayed and possibly contested. In all these ways, Wisconsin today may foreshadow the entire United States in November.

Carbon has a bad rep, but did you know it's a building block of life? As atoms evolved, carbon trapped in CO2 was freed, giving way to the creation of complex molecules that use photosynthesis to convert carbon to food. Soon after, plants, herbivores, and carnivores began populating the earth and the cycle of life began.

Learn more about how carbon created life on Earth in the second episode of Eni's Story of CO2 series.

On Tuesday night, you can finally watch Trump and Biden tangle on the debate stage. But you TOO can go head to head on debate night .. with your fellow US politics junkies.

Print out GZERO's handy debate BINGO cards and get ready to rumble. There are four different cards so that each player may have a unique board. Every time one of the candidates says one of these words or terms, X it on your card. First player to get five across wins. And if you really want to jazz it up, you can mark each of your words by taking a swig of your drink, or doing five burpees, or donating to your favorite charity or political candidate. Whatever gets you tipsy, in shape, or motivated, get the bingo cards here. It's fight night!

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Join us today, September 29th, at 11 am ET for a GZERO Town Hall livestream event, Ending the COVID-19 Pandemic, to learn about the latest in the global hunt for a COVID-19 vaccine.

Watch here at 11am ET: https://www.gzeromedia.com/events/town-hall-ending-the-covid-19-pandemic-livestream/

Our panel will discuss where things really stand on vaccine development, the political and economic challenges of distribution, and what societies need to be focused on until vaccine arrives in large scale. This event is the second in a series presented by GZERO Media in partnership with the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Eurasia Group.

Apoorva Mandavilli, science & global health reporter for the New York Times, will moderate a conversation with:

  • Lynda Stuart, Deputy Director, Vaccines & Human Immunobiology, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • Rohitesh Dhawan, Managing Director, Energy, Climate & Resources, Eurasia Group
  • Mark Suzman, CEO, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • Gayle E. Smith, President & CEO, ONE Campaign and former Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development

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700,000: An additional 700,000 Syrian children may go hungry this year due to the combined effects of the war-ravaged country's economic implosion, as well as coronavirus restrictions, pushing the total number of food-insecure kids in Syria to over 4.6 million, according to Save the Children. Two thirds of surveyed children have not eaten any fresh fruit in three months.

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The long-simmering conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over a region called Nagorno-Karabakh erupted over the weekend, with more than 50 killed (so far) in the fiercest fighting in years. Will it escalate into an all-out war that threatens regional stability and drags in major outside players?

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