North Korea No Deal

Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un are back to sleeping in their own beds after their summit in Vietnam ended without an agreement. Trump is eager to emphasize that relations with Kim remain sunny. "This wasn't a walk away like you get up and walk out," he said. "No, this was very friendly. We shook hands," noted the president.

Two days later, how are the major players viewing the walkout in Hanoi?

Happy With How Things Went

China – Beijing wants the Korean Peninsula quiet, particularly as President Xi Jinping focuses on advancing trade talks with Trump. There's no American armada steaming toward trouble, no Korean rockets' red glare, and the two sides will keep talking.

Trump doubters – Some Americans, and US allies, feared Trump would offer Kim big concessions in exchange for vague promises. The president made clear he had no intention of doing that. Sanctions remain firmly in place.

Vietnam – Hanoi proved it could host a major international gathering on frighteningly short notice. The country's expanding economy and solid relations with the US offer a favorable contrast with North Korea.

Wary About What Comes Next

Japan – Fears that Trump would ease pressure without promises from Kim to scrap missiles that can hit Tokyo were not realized. But talks will continue at a lower level, and Japan will watch anxiously to see what comes next.

Unhappy With How Things Went

South Korea – President Moon needed a breakthrough to expand economic cooperation with the North, a key component of his domestic political agenda. The summit's failure forced him to call off a major announcement on the "Future of Korean Peace and Prosperity" he hoped would advance peace and boost his political standing.

Kim – If Kim was hoping Trump would give a lot to get a little, he left disappointed. So, what's plan B?

Trump – With so much trouble awaiting him back in Washington, Trump needed something he could sell as a major breakthrough. His refusal to move first will play well with North Korea skeptics, but Trump needed a big win to distract from the gathering storm back in Washington.

What's Next?

The summit's failure doesn't close the book on nuclear talks, but Trump's refusal to lift sanctions before Kim takes bigger steps leaves North Korea's leader with tough decisions on how to move forward. Though North Korea's foreign minister disputes Trump's account of what North Korea wanted and offered, Trump says Kim has promised to hold off on nuclear and ballistic missile tests to keep open the hope for future progress.

But there's nothing in writing. Kim could restart testing to try to force Trump to offer him something new. Or maybe he calculates that events in Washington ensure Trump won't be around much longer.

Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan announced a $1 billion, four-year commitment of additional support to address economic and racial inequalities in our local communities that have been intensified by the global pandemic.

Learn more.

Have you heard? The Republican president of the United States proposed a plan for "partial basic income" and his plan passed the House of Representatives. In 1969.

President's Nixon's plan, which he called "the most significant piece of social legislation in our nation's history," died in the Senate and never became law. It hasn't really made a comeback in the US. But the idea of "guaranteed basic income" is already back in the news in Europe, because income inequality — exacerbated by COVID-19 — will become increasingly hard for the world's political leaders to ignore.

More Show less

Poland's election set: After a grueling political fight between the far-right Law and Justice Party, which heads the government, and opposition parties on how and when to hold a presidential election during a global pandemic, Poland says the ballot will now go ahead on June 28. For the incumbent government, led by President Andrzej Duda, the election is a chance to further solidify its agenda of social conservatism and an alarming reworking of the country's democratic institutions. While April polls strongly favored Duda, the pandemic-induced economic crisis has dented his ratings in recent weeks, giving centrist candidates a slightly better chance to take the nation's top job. Indeed, in last year's election, the Law and Justice party won only a very shaky parliamentary majority and needs Duda to stay at the helm, not least in order to pass controversial judicial reforms that the EU has long-deemed as undemocratic.

More Show less

The coronavirus crisis has clobbered all European economies, but most have avoided a severe spike in unemployment. That's in part because of government programs that directly subsidize workers' wages while also incentivizing employers to keep workers on the payroll by reducing their hours. This approach has shielded much of Europe from the kind of unemployment calamity that's plaguing the United States, where the jobless rate has increased sixfold since January and is now more than double that of the Euro area. Here's a look at how European job markets have fared in the time of coronavirus.

As protests over the police killing of George Floyd raged across the country, there have been more than 125 instances of journalists being shot with rubber bullets by police, arrested, or in some cases assaulted by protesters while covering the unrest.

Foreign news crews from Germany and Australia have been caught up in the crackdown. Australia's Prime Minister has even called for an investigation. Some of these journalists have simply been caught in the crossfire during surges of unrest, but video and photographic evidence reveals cases where police have deliberately targeted reporters doing their jobs.

More Show less