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Italy: An Innovative Government?

Italy: An Innovative Government?

When it comes to political dysfunction, Italy is an innovator. In the 73 years since the fascist regime of Benito Mussolini collapsed, the country has had 64 governments (soon to be 65).


Yet as my pal @gflipton explains, an unlikely pact between Italy’s left-wing 5-Star Movement and far-right Lega, which should be finalized this week, would represent an even more novel accomplishment: a marriage of evenly-matched populist parties from opposite ends of the political spectrum that even the most creative anti-establishment leaders have struggled to emulate elsewhere.

But beyond a shared disdain of the status quo and establishment politicians, there are few areas of agreement between Five-Star and the League, meaning that this marriage could be a rocky one.

Perhaps the thorniest issue is fiscal policy, where both parties want to put more money in Italians’ pockets, but disagree on how to do that: 5-Star wants to implement a universal basic income scheme for all citizens, while the League favors a 15 percent flat tax. Either of those options would severely test Italy’s already-shaky adherence to EU fiscal rules — current estimates suggest they would cost an additional $100 billion to $120 billion a year, a potentially dangerous economic burden for Europe’s second-most indebted country (after Greece).

Can both parties get what they’ve promised their voters without coming to blows with each other or provoking a crisis with Brussels? The 5-Star/Lega tie-up is a political high-wire act with almost no safety net below.

Empathy and listening are key to establishing harmonious relationships, as demonstrated by Callista Azogu, GM of Human Resources & Organization for Nigerian Agip Oil Company (NAOC), an Eni subsidiary in Abuja. "To build trust is very difficult. To destroy it is very easy," says Callista, whose busy days involve everything from personnel issues to union relationships. She sees great potential for her native Nigeria not only because of the country's natural resources, but because of its vibrant and creative people.

Learn more about Callista in this episode of Faces of Eni.

For the world's wealthiest nations, including the United States, the rollout of COVID-19 vaccine has been rocky, to say the least. And as a result, much of the developing world will have to wait even longer for their turn. Part of the challenge, World Bank President David Malpass says, is that "advanced economies have reserved a lot of the vaccine doses." Malpass sat down with Ian Bremmer recently to talk about what his organization is doing to try to keep millions around the world from slipping deeper into poverty during the pandemic. Their conversation was part of the latest episode of GZERO World.

Saturday will mark the beginning of an historic turning point for European politics as 1,001 voting members of Germany's Christian Democratic Union, the party of Chancellor Angela Merkel, hold an online conference to elect a new leader.

Here are the basic facts:

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For the first time in twenty years, extreme poverty around the world is growing. How does the developing world recover from a pandemic that has brought even the richest nations to their knees? David Malpass, the President of the World Bank, is tasked with answering that question. He joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to talk about how his organization is trying to keep the developing world from slipping further into poverty in the wake of a once-in-a-century pandemic.

Joe Biden wants to move into the White House, but the coast isn't clear. He may need some bleach.

Watch more PUPPET REGIME here.

The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

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