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What We're Watching: Trudeau in Trouble

What We're Watching: Trudeau in Trouble

Justin Trudeau's Bid to Save Face – Canada's prime minister shouldn't play dress-up anymore. An unfortunate series of outfits he and his family wore during a visit to India in 2018 drew widespread mockery, and now there are old photos and video of Justin Trudeau wearing brown and black makeup on separate occasions at costume parties years ago. Trudeau has acknowledged that the costumes are racist and apologized profusely. It'll be up to Canadian voters to decide on October 21 just how seriously they take these spectacular lapses of judgment and good taste. In the meantime, Signal readers can enjoy this video of Trudeau throwing himself down a flight of stairs.


Child Soldiers in South Sudan – Though a shaky peace agreement remains in place, rival sides from a civil war that tore the country apart between 2013 and 2018 are rapidly increasing their recruitment of child soldiers and sex slaves, according to the UN. The irony is that the peace agreement itself may be contributing to this trend: whoever has the most troops will be eligible for the most funds for reintegration and disarmament. A unity transition government is due to be formed by November, but as the ranks of combatants continue to swell, with slim prospects for a strong central government, this conflict could easily reignite.

A Coverup Uncovered in Brazil – Last spring, gunmen in Rio de Janeiro murdered city councillor Marielle Franco, a 38-year old gay, black, single mother who had been a fierce critic of police brutality. Mass protests ensued. Two former police officers were arrested in connection with the killing, but Brazil's outgoing prosecutor general, Raquel Dodge, now says five local officials have tried to scuttle the investigation. She has recommended indicting them and called on federal authorities to take charge of the probe. Brazil's government is led by a man who has openly encouraged violence by the police, so we're watching to see whether justice will be served.

What We're Ignoring

Brexit Without Booze – British companies have begun stockpiling beer, wine and hard liquor to ensure that Brexit won't leave Britons high and dry during the Christmas holidays. Post-Brexit family gatherings will be difficult enough; enduring them without booze would provoke a true national crisis.

Empathy and listening are key to establishing harmonious relationships, as demonstrated by Callista Azogu, GM of Human Resources & Organization for Nigerian Agip Oil Company (NAOC), an Eni subsidiary in Abuja. "To build trust is very difficult. To destroy it is very easy," says Callista, whose busy days involve everything from personnel issues to union relationships. She sees great potential for her native Nigeria not only because of the country's natural resources, but because of its vibrant and creative people.

Learn more about Callista in this episode of Faces of Eni.

Saturday will mark the beginning of an historic turning point for European politics as 1,001 voting members of Germany's Christian Democratic Union, the party of Chancellor Angela Merkel, hold an online conference to elect a new leader.

Here are the basic facts:

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Does Cuba belong back on the US's State Sponsors of Terrorism list? The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board showed their support for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's decision on this issue in a recent opinion piece, "Cuba's Support for Terror." But in this edition of The Red Pen, Ian Bremmer and Eurasia Group analysts Risa Grais-Targow, Jeffrey Wright and Regina Argenzio argue that the WSJ's op-ed goes too far.

We are now just a few days away from the official end of Donald Trump's presidency, but the impacts of his latest moves in office will obviously last far beyond Joe Biden's inauguration. There's the deep structural political polarization, the ongoing investigations into the violence we saw at the Capitol, lord knows what happens over the next few days, there's also last-minute policy decisions here and abroad. And that's where we're taking our Red Pen this week, specifically US relations with Cuba.

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Watch Jon Lieber, who leads Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, lend perspective to this week's historic impeachment proceedings.

Impeachment. President Trump became the first president ever to be impeached twice this week. And the question on everybody's mind is will he be convicted in the Senate? And I think the answer right now is we just don't know. I'd probably bet against it. There was a really strong Republican vote against impeaching him in the House, with only 10 of the over 100 Republicans breaking with the President and voting to impeach him. And the question now is in the Senate, is there more support for a conviction? Senate Majority Leader McConnell has indicated he's at least open to it and wants to hear some of the facts. And I expect you're going to hear a lot of other Republicans make the same statement, at least until the trial begins.

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They call it Einstein. It's the multibillion-dollar digital defense system the US has used to catch outside hackers and attackers since 2003. But it was no match for what's looking like one of the biggest cyber breaches in US history. Ian Bremmer breaks it down.

Watch the GZERO World episode: Cyber attack: an act of espionage or war?

The GZERO World Podcast with Ian Bremmer. Listen now.

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