3 Things You Shouldn't Worry About

Don't let a US-China trade war, trouble in Kashmir, the showdown in Hong Kong, the DRC's Ebola emergency, new warnings from Iran and North Korea, the Venezuelan embargo, a Russian crackdown, Brexit risks, and the toxic American political culture persuade you that all the news this week was bad.

Here are three new pieces of good news:


Moscow's New Graffiti Rules: No need to fear that your upcoming visit to the Russian capital will expose you to offensive graffiti. New rules ensure that Moscow street artists must avoid depictions of violence, sex, naughty words, drugs, tobacco, explosives and anything else not directly related to science, sport, art, historical events, or the popularization of "outstanding personalities." Russian graffiti artists, world renowned for their respect for local authorities, will definitely obey these new rules.

Traffic in Lagos: Nor is their need to fear that your drive across Lagos will be impacted by the kind of late-night traffic jam the city experienced this week. Confusion reigned when drivers were confronted with a glass-sided truck with a seated man inside tossing cash at women dancing around stripper poles in their underwear. Turns out this was a one-time problem created by Augustine Kelechi, better known in Nigeria by the stage name Tekno, who responded to complaints on social media by explaining that he and the dancers were merely travelling between locations while shooting a music video. This (probably) won't happen again.

Squawkzilla: Scientists searching the bottom of a lake in New Zealand have found the fossilized leg bones of an ancient parrot they say was probably flightless, carnivorous, and half the height of an adult human. That's tall enough, an Australian paleontologist helpfully noted this week, "to pick the belly button lint out of your belly button." Signal estimates just a 7 percent chance that you will encounter a bird this size as you travel through New Zealand this weekend.

Imagine losing your child in their first year of life and having no idea what caused it. This is the heartbreaking reality for thousands of families each year who lose a child to Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID). Despite decades-long efforts to prevent SUID, it remains the leading cause of death for children between one month and one year of age in developed nations. Working in collaboration with researchers at Seattle Children's Research Institute and the University of Auckland, Microsoft analyzed the Center for Disease Control (CDC) data on every child born in the U.S. over a decade, including over 41 million births and 37,000 SUID deaths.

By pairing Microsoft's capabilities and data scientists with Seattle Children's medical research expertise, progress is being made on identifying the cause of SUID. Earlier this year, a study was published that estimated approximately 22% of SUID deaths in the U.S. were attributable to maternal cigarette-smoking during pregnancy, giving us further evidence that, through our collaboration with experts in varying disciplines, we are getting to the root of this problem and making remarkable advances.

Read more at Microsoft On The Issues.

After a months-long investigation into whether President Donald Trump pressured Ukraine's president into investigating his political rivals in order to boost his reelection prospects in 2020, House Democrats brought two articles of impeachment against him, charging him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Click here for our GZERO guide to what comes next.

In the meantime, imagine for a moment that you are now Mitch McConnell, Senate Majority leader and senior member of Donald Trump's Republican Party. You've got big choices to make.

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Trump gets his deal – House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced yesterday that Democrats will back the USMCA, the US-Mexico-Canada trade agreement that will replace the North American Free Trade Agreement. Crucially, the bill will also have support from the nation's largest labor union. This is a major political victory for President Trump, who promised he would close this deal, but it's also good for Pelosi: it shows that the Democrats' House majority can still accomplish big things even as it impeaches the president. But with the speed of the Washington news cycle these days, we're watching to see if anyone is still talking about USMCA three days after it's signed.

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After a months-long investigation into whether President Donald Trump pressured Ukraine's president into investigating his political rivals in order to boost his reelection prospects in 2020, House Democrats on Tuesday brought two articles of impeachment against him. They charge Trump with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

So, what are the next steps?

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