Hard Numbers: The House of Saud cracks down on dissent– again

13: A helicopter accident in Mali on Monday night killed 13 French soldiers, the single biggest loss for France since its intervention in the West African country in 2013. The crash occurred during a clash with armed militants who have staged a series of deadly attacks in northern Mali in recent weeks.


3.9: Global temperatures are on track to rise around 3.9 degrees Celsius by the end of the century (7 degrees Fahrenheit), which would have disastrous implications, according to a grim United Nation's report. Increasingly acidic oceans could dissolve all coral reefs, and severe heat, already extreme in many regions, would become intolerable, the report warns.

9: Saudi Arabia is intensifying its crackdown on dissent within the kingdom: at least nine journalists, writers and academics have been detained in recent weeks, according to a rights group. The New York Times reported that recent arrests included a female journalist who tweeted support for political prisoners.

76: The World Health Organization and the UN Children's Fund evacuated 76 staff working in the Ebola epidemic zone in the Democratic Republic of Congo due to the country's deteriorating security situation. A deadly attack by rebel factions that left at least eight people dead angered residents who say the government and UN peacekeeping forces were "unwilling to intervene" to fend off attackers.

Eni's luminescent solar concentrators can help smart windows and next-generation buildings generate electricity. But even Eni hadn't imagined using this technology to create eyeglasses capable of charging mobile phones and headsets.

Introducing Funny Applications, Eni's video series that imagines new, unexpected uses for technology. Watch the premiere episode.

We've written recently about how the COVID-19 pandemic will hit poorer countries particularly hard. But the burden of the virus' spread also falls more heavily on working class people even in wealthy countries, particularly in Europe and the United States. This is exacerbating the divide between rich and poor that had already upended the political establishment in countries around the world even before anyone had heard of a "novel coronavirus."

Why?

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Meet Mark Wetton, a Kentucky-based businessman who owns a dust-collection factory in Wuhan. He has been there since the beginning of the outbreak, and describes the onset of the COVID-19 outbreak there, life in lockdown, and what things are like today as the city finally begins to reopen its borders and come back to life. He also shares some lessons learned that he hopes Americans will heed.

The coronavirus is likely to hit poorer countries particularly hard, but it is also laying a bigger burden on working class people even in wealthy ones. As less affluent people suffer disproportionately not only from the disease, but also from the economic costs of containing it, we can expect a worsening of income inequalities that have already upended global politics over the past few years. Here is a look at inequality in some of the countries hardest hit by COVID-19 so far.

500 million: The economic fallout from the coronavirus pandemic could plunge 500 million people into poverty, according to a new report released by Oxfam. As incomes and economies continue to contract, global poverty will increase for the first time in 30 years, the report predicts, undermining many of the gains of globalization that have pulled millions out of poverty in recent years.

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