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Bolsonaro tests positive for coronavirus; Trudeau assassination attempt

Ian Bremmer shares his perspective on global politics on this week's World In (More Than) 60 Seconds:

Jair Bolsonaro, the president of Brazil, has coronavirus. What are your thoughts and where does this leave Brazil?

Well, I mean, you know, if coronavirus was karmic, and I don't believe that, Bolsonaro would be the president you kind of expect would get it, right? Because he's been saying, "it's just a little flu, don't worry about it, I don't need to wear a mask, everyone can come out and rally, we can hug, we can hold hands, we can shake hands with no problem." He's been doing that for months now and he's exposed to an awful lot of people, both in Brazil and internationally, including in the United States when he traveled to meet with President Trump in Mar a Lago. And now he's taken the test. The 65-year-old president has coronavirus.

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Bolsonaro tests positive. What happens next?

Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro tested positive for the coronavirus on Tuesday. To understand what that means for the country's politics and public health policy, GZERO sat down with Christopher Garman, top Brazil expert at our parent company, Eurasia Group. The exchange has been lightly edited for clarity and concision.

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Bolsonaro is an incompetent populist, not planning a military coup

The Financial Times says Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro is a threat to his country's democracy. Not so fast. In this episode of The Red Pen — where we do our best to keep op-eds honest — Ian Bremmer and Eurasia Group's Chris Garman and Filipe Carvalho poke holes in the FT's argument.

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COVID-19 in São Paulo: A doctor on the frontline in Brazil's epicenter

Brazil, South America's largest economy, has largely been unprepared for the coronavirus pandemic as it spreads through the nation. Tens of thousands are sick as populist President Jair Bolsonaro continues to dismiss the disease as "fantasy." Bolsonaro accused mayors who have imposed lockdown as "falling into a state of panic," and he recently fired his widely popular health minister (the Dr. Tony Fauci of Brazil).

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Will there be more drastic lockdown measures in the US soon?

Ian Bremmer provides his perspective in (slightly) more than 60 seconds: In fighting this pandemic, do you anticipate more drastic lockdown measures in the US soon?

No, I think the answer to that at this point is no. Even though we expect the next week, two weeks, are going to be the most challenging in terms of the numbers of new cases and deaths in different cities across the country. No, the bigger question is when we start to see a relaxation of that lockdown, which will certainly start happening in the coming, say, four-six weeks, but in different states, in different cities, with different politics behind them, what's the likelihood we have to engage in new shut down? Which is incredibly difficult to do and will make those political leaders look like they acted intemperately. You already see that in places where they've acted very well.

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