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An image of Elon Musk is seen on a smartphone placed on printed Twitter logos.

REUTERS/Dado Ruvic

What We're Watching: The end of Twitter (as we know it), climate reparations at COP27

Quo vadis, Elon?

Elon Musk is taking disruption to a whole new level as the CEO of Twitter. After firing half of his staff on Friday, the world's richest man has lit another fire with plans for an $8 subscription service to get verified on the social media platform. Before Musk took over, the coveted blue check was free for public figures, companies, and journalists, but now technically anybody can get it. That raises the stakes for all sorts of misinformation mayhem, though the rollout has now been delayed until after Tuesday's US midterm elections. Major corporate advertisers responded to the brouhaha by pausing their ads, with Musk admitting a big drop in revenue, which he blamed on firms caving to activists' demands. So, what’s next? Ian Bremmer — who tussled with Musk over Russia-Ukraine just weeks before the gazillionaire bought Twitter — hinted that the platform's new boss might have a shorter tenure than disgraced former British PM Liz Truss, who famously lasted less time than a head of lettuce in her last days in office. For Russia, Bremmer noted, "buying a few thousand verified Twitter accounts at $8/pop to promote disinfo feels like a no-brainer."

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Want to Become Energy-Independent? Transition to Renewables, Says John Kerry | GZERO World

How Russia is both hurting & helping climate action

Under the Biden administration, the US wants to become a global leader on climate change. But the energy crisis from the war in Ukraine has put climate lower on the list of global priorities.

Still, the main climate lesson learned from the invasion is that countries need to become energy-independent by embracing renewables, US climate envoy John Kerry tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

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Ian Explains: How Biden's Climate Bill Moves The US Towards Clean Energy | GZERO World

How Biden's climate bill moves the US towards clean energy

Despite its name, the recently passed US Inflation Reduction Act won't do much to tame rising prices. But it will do a lot to fight climate change by slashing carbon emissions from power generation and transport, Ian Bremmer explains on GZERO World.

Interestingly, the bill offers more carrots than sticks to encourage American families and businesses to use more clean energy, Ian Bremmer tells GZERO World. Also, it responded to the Supreme Court's ruling against the Environmental Protection Agency by reaffirming the EPA's authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions.

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US Eager to Work With China on Clean Hydrogen, Says Energy Secretary | GZERO World

Climate action: an "oasis of diplomacy" for US/China, says Energy Secretary Granholm

China is the world's top emitter of greenhouse gases. Despite a recent chill in ties over Taiwan, President Biden is eager to reengage Beijing on things like clean hydrogen, US Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

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Jennifer Granholm: US “Putting Our Money Where Our Mouth Is” on Clean Energy | GZERO World

Jennifer Granholm: On clean energy, US is "putting our money where our mouth is”

This November, the US wants to present itself at the COP27 Climate Summit in Egypt as a global leader on renewables with the $370 billion worth of clean energy investment included in the recently passed Inflation Reduction Act.

Something like this has never been done before, and the figure could be double once you add private sector dollars, says Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm.

America, she tells Ian Bremmer on GZERO World, finally has "some moral authority to say we are putting our money where our mouth is on this."

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Rishi Deka/Sipa USA via Reuters Connect

Podcast: Biden's climate bill sets US up to lead on clean energy, says Sec. Jennifer Granholm

Listen: The Biden administration has pushed through the single largest climate spending package in US history. US Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to discuss how the new law could help the United States and the world respond to climate change. The Inflation Reduction Act is Biden's biggest legislative win since the American Rescue Act early in his term in office. It is intended to fight climate change by slashing carbon emissions from power generation and transport. According to Granholm, it will help by giving Americans incentives to use renewable energy in their cars and homes. And that, in turn, will lower the cost of energy prices at home. She also shares her perspective on Europe's current energy woes and hopes for an opening on climate cooperation with China.

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform, to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

Smoke is discharged from chimneys at a coal-fired power plant in China's Jiangsu province.

Reuters

How China fits into global climate change

Want to tackle climate change? If so you'll have to reach out to China, which is currently responsible for over a quarter of global carbon dioxide emissions. Beijing will certainly take your call, as climate is a huge priority for President Xi Jinping.

Xi has promised that China will go "net zero" — meaning its carbon emissions will be offset by equal amounts of either natural or tech-driven carbon capture — by 2060. Is a decade later than most of the top 10 polluting countries fast enough for the rest of the world? It is for the Chinese, who want to help but have their own ideas about how.

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Nuclear energy is costly — and still highly unpopular a decade after the Fukushima disaster in Japan. But it also generates emissions-free electricity. Will countries embrace nuclear power to fight climate change?

Gabriella Turrisi

After Fukushima, can nuclear power actually help save the planet?

Ten years ago this week, a powerful earthquake off the coast of eastern Japan triggered a tsunami that destroyed the Fukushima nuclear plant, resulting in the world's worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl in 1986. A decade and dozens of decommissioned reactors later, nuclear energy still supplies about 10 percent of global electricity, but its future remains uncertain.

As more countries pledge to curb emissions to mitigate climate change, nuclear could serve as a clean(ish) and reliable source of energy. But investing more in nuclear comes with tradeoffs.

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