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Al Gore is optimistic about our climate future
Al Gore is optimistic about our climate future | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Al Gore is optimistic about our climate future

Former US Vice President Al Gore is known to many as the Paul Revere of climate change, alerting the world to the dangers of a warming planet and other "inconvenient truths" at a time when only 2/5 Americans were onboard with his message. It earned him a Nobel Peace Prize.

But today, Al Gore has good news to share. In a wide-ranging interview with Ian Bremmer on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Gore is clear-eyed but optimistic about our climate future.

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Al Gore on US elections & climate change
Misinformation & disinformation threaten US democracy, warns Al Gore | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Al Gore on US elections & climate change

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer sits down with former Vice President Al Gore to get his take on the current state of American politics and the work he is now best known for—climate action.
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Al Gore's take on American democracy, climate action, and "artificial insanity"

Listen: In this episode of GZERO World podcast, Ian Bremmer sits down with former US Vice President Al Gore on the sidelines of Davos in Switzerland. Gore, an individual well-versed in navigating contested elections, shared his perspectives on the current landscape of American politics and, naturally, his renowned contributions to climate action.

While the mainstage discussions at the World Economic Forum throughout the week delved into topics such as artificial intelligence, conflicts in Ukraine and the Middle East, and climate change, behind the scenes, much of the discourse was centered on profound concerns about the upcoming 2024 US election and the state of American democracy. The US presidential election presents substantial risks, particularly with Donald Trump on the path to securing the GOP nomination.

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Bjorn Lomborg wants to redefine climate change's impact on our lives and economy
Bjorn Lomborg wants to redefine climate change's impact on our lives and economy | GZERO Media

Bjorn Lomborg wants to redefine climate change's impact on our lives and economy

Climate change is an urgent problem, but it can be helpful to think about it in the long term because it’s a problem that will be inherited by generations to come.

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer challenges controversial climate author Bjorn Lomborg on whether his perspective on climate would be different if he were going to live for 200 years instead of the typical 85. But Lomborg holds fast in his belief that though climate change will affect the trajectory of human progress, it won’t lead to the most dire predictions forecast by climate scientists. Instead of searching for a panacea, Lomborg says the world should focus on policies that address climate change in the most cost-effective and efficient ways.

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The Global South is angry and mistrustful - Ian Bremmer
The Global South is angry and mistrustful - Ian Bremmer | Global Stage | GZERO Media

The Global South is angry and mistrustful - Ian Bremmer

Frustrated with the lack of equitable access to vaccines, economic challenges, and climate change impacts while wealthier countries fail to fulfill their pledges, the Global South is angry and mistrustful, said Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group, during a Global Stage livestream event at UN headquarters in New York on September 22, on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly.

"They feel like their agenda is irrelevant, that they are the takers, not in any way the collaborators or makers on the rule space and how we're going to deal with global governance challenges," Bremmer says.

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"Climate is a problem, not the end of the world" - Danish author Bjorn Lomborg
"Climate is a problem, not the end of the world" - Danish author Bjorn Lomberg | GZERO Media

"Climate is a problem, not the end of the world" - Danish author Bjorn Lomborg

How far should the world go to stop climate change? On GZERO World with Ian Bremmer, controversial Danish author Bjorn Lomborg discusses his perspective on climate and how it differs from the global climate narrative.

Lomborg acknowledges that global warming is a genuine problem but argues it’s not an apocalyptic threat. This nuance is important, Lomborg says. Because it allows for a more balanced approach to addressing climate, as opposed to an all-encompassing focus on the issue of lowering carbon emissions.

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Climate change: are we overreacting?
Climate change: are we overreacting? | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Climate change: are we overreacting?

Climate experts agree that climate change is real and human-caused. But how far should the world go to combat it? Will the worst-case scenarios forecast by climate scientists end up a reality?

On GZERO World with Ian Bremmer, author Bjorn Lomborg says the answer is no. Climate change is indeed a problem, he says, but “it’s not the end of the world.”

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Ian Explains: Can we save the planet without hurting the economy?
Ian Explains: Can we save the planet without hurting the economy? | GZERO Media

Ian Explains: Can we save the planet without hurting the economy?

“How much are we willing to sacrifice to stop climate change?”

That’s how the conversation is usually framed, that fighting climate change requires some sort of trade-off: save the planet vs. maintain living standards, reduce carbon emissions vs. increase profits, lower global temperatures vs. lift more people out of poverty.

On Ian Explains, Ian Bremmer argues that this framing is actually a false choice. In the last decade, the underlying technology and economics of decarbonization have improved so much, we no longer need to choose between investing in climate mitigation and economic growth. In fact, clean energy technology like solar panels, wind turbines, and advanced battery storage have become, in many ways, more affordable than fossil fuels.

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