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Making plastic industry sustainable is corporate self-interest

Plastics are essential for Asia, but for Ian Bremmer the way the industry works right now is incompatible with the region's targets to fight climate change. Very soon, though, he predicts there will be "immense gravitational pull" to do things differently. Once the way Asian companies use plastics now becomes outdated, he says, it's only a matter of time before they change out of their own self-interest. Bremmer spoke during the second of a two-part Sustainability Leaders Summit livestream conversation sponsored by Suntory.

Fix climate change, don't just adapt to its consequences

Should the world be focusing more on adaptation as an answer to the climate crisis? In a recent Wall Street Journal op-ed, Danish author Bjorn Lomborg argues that countries - and the media - are panicking over climate change instead of concentrating on tactics like levees and floodwalls. Ian Bremmer takes out the Red Pen to explain why these solutions are not enough to protect the planet.

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Eurasia Group’s Gerald Butts: US climate change debate has moved from finger-pointing to solutions

Five years ago, for the US president to say it's time to move away from fossil fuels sounded like an episode of The West Wing. Not anymore, says Eurasia Group Vice Chairman Gerald Butts. In his view, the climate debate in the West has (finally) moved from who's responsible, to what we're going to do about it — "much more productive ground." Butts admits the enormous inertia in the US political system that'll fight change on climate, but ultimately believes that "when you take the very long view, the direction of travel of has set in."

Why biodiversity loss from climate change matters

Raging fires, droughts, and superstorms like Sandy and Katrina are very visible impacts of climate change, but the damage to animals and plants flies under the radar. For UN environment chief Inger Andersen, that's because humans often take biodiversity for granted despite having messed up more than three-quarters of the planet's land and sea — and the consequences will be severe when nature stops behaving. "We have fragmented […] and converted so much land that nature is being squeezed into little corners." Watch her interview with Ian Bremmer on GZERO World.

Watch this episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer: Surviving a warming planet

Some Asian countries leading on recycling plastics

Asia produces half of the world's plastic and consumes more than 40 percent of it — yet doesn't recycle as much as other regions. But things are getting better. Eurasia Group climate & sustainability expert Colleen King shares examples from Japan, South Korea, and Indonesia — all of which show that Asia can do a lot more on sustainable plastics without the consumer pressure that's driving change in the West. King spoke during the second of a two-part Sustainability Leaders Summit livestream conversation sponsored by Suntory.

Surviving a warming planet

Fires, floods, and droughts. Climate change is already happening but so far humans have been slow to react. Will the UN Climate Conference (COP26) produce lasting change or just more hot air? On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer speaks with Inger Andersen, Executive Director of the UN Environment Program. Plus, a look at what's driving the United Kingdom's fuel shortage.

Refuse single-use plastics — but not the rest: Aloke Lohia

Refusing single-use plastics is okay, but Aloke Lohia, CEO of Indorama Ventures, believes all other plastics should be given "a fair chance" at recycling. Lohia says that some plastics are already 100 percent reusable, while chemical recycling is "just around the corner." Lohia spoke during the second of a two-part Sustainability Leaders Summit livestream conversation sponsored by Suntory.

Asia will lose land as the planet warms, says IPCC's Ko Barrett

Last August, a landmark IPCC report underscored the urgency of the climate crisis — with big implications for Asia, the region most at risk. Ko Barret, vice president at the IPCC, says Asia should especially watch out for a combination of sea level rise above the global average and a lot more rain than usual that'll together result in shorelines receding along the Mekong delta.

Barrett spoke during the first of a two-part Sustainability Leaders Summit livestream conversation sponsored by Suntory. Watch here.

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