GZERO Media logo
{{ subpage.title }}

A turning point for Venezuela?

For nearly two years, two men have claimed to be president in Venezuela. But after legislative elections over the weekend, one of them may finally lose out.

President Nicolás Maduro's sweeping victory in Sunday's vote will cement his grip on power, while raising big questions about the future of opposition leader Juan Guaidó, recognized by the US and other democracies as "interim president" since 2019. Guaidó and his supporters had gambled on boycotting the election because they said it would be rigged. But now, as a result, he has lost his perch as speaker of the National Assembly, and with it, his legal claim to the presidency.

What does the aftermath of the election mean for the two men vying to rule the country?

Read Now Show less

Opposition Leader Juan Guaidó: Venezuela in 60 Seconds

I am Juan Guaidó, interim president of Venezuela by our constitution and the mandate of our citizens. This is Venezuela in sixty seconds. Venezuela is a country with the largest oil reserves in the world that today is mired in the worst humanitarian crisis in the history of our continent.

Read Now Show less

Attempted Coup in Venezuela: World in 60 Seconds

What do Spain's election tell us about populism in Europe?

It says that populism is continuing to grow. The VOX party on the far right for the first time breaks through 10%. They are in Parliament, they've got 24 seats, and like so many other countries across Europe that's something that is continuing to grow. Their popularity is mostly in the south, where all of those North African immigrants are coming in.

Read Now Show less

Guaidó to GZERO: "Freedom" is the goal

Juan Guaidó, the opposition leader recognized as Venezuela's interim president by more than 50 countries, returned on Monday to Venezuela after nearly two weeks abroad.

His homecoming reignites the contest for power between him and President Nicolás Maduro, who still controls much of the government and the military, despite plummeting popularity and a deepening humanitarian crisis.

Guaidó shared a few words with GZERO Media just moments after he landed and rushed into a crowd of cheering supporters at Caracas' Simón Bolívar Airport. His comments are among the first he has made to foreign media since returning to Venezuela.

Latest