scroll to top arrow or icon

{{ subpage.title }}

The Disinformation Election: Will the wildfire of conspiracy theories impact the vote?

Trust in institutions is at an all-time low, and only 44% of Americans have confidence in the honesty of elections. Distrust and election-related disinformation are leaving society vulnerable to conspiracy theories.

Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media, notes that American democracy is in crisis largely because “one thing not in short supply this election season: conspiracy theories.”

As part of GZERO Media’s election coverage, we are tracking the impact of disinformation and conspiracy theories on democracy. To get a sense of how this election may be pulled down a dark and dangerous rabbit hole, click here for our interactive guide to conspiracy theories.

US Capitol under attack on January 6th.

Leslie dela Vega

Ian Bremmer: American democracy at risk thanks to conspiracy theories

American democracy is in crisis, says Eurasia Group President Ian Bremmer, largely because “one thing not in short supply this election season: conspiracy theories.”

Trust in institutions – from the Supreme Court to public schools – is at an all-time low, and only 44% of Americans have confidence in the honesty of elections. Distrust and election-related disinformation are leaving society vulnerable to conspiracy theories.

Read moreShow less

Former U.S. President Donald Trump gestures as he makes a statement to the media outside the court room at a Manhattan courthouse, during the trial of himself, his adult sons, the Trump Organization and others in a civil fraud case brought by state Attorney General Letitia James, in New York City, U.S., October 2, 2023.

REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Will Trump’s “sham” talk go unchecked?

While former President Donald Trump appeared fairly calm in a Lower Manhattan courtroom on Monday during the first day of his civil fraud trial, outside the chambers he was anything but.

Read moreShow less

Former President of the United States Donald J. Trump.

Reuters

Georgia poses new dangers for Trump

Late Monday night, Donald Trump and 18 other people were indicted by a grand jury in Atlanta for conspiring to overturn the results of the 2020 election in the state of Georgia.

Trump will face 13 felony charges. Former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, and other alleged co-conspirators are charged with taking part in a “criminal enterprise” to flip the presidential election in a crucial state.

You can read the full indictment here.

Let’s cut to the chase: Trump has already been indicted three times – in New York City, Washington, DC, and Florida – and he faces dozens of other felony charges in those cases. And though it’s too soon to know the likelihood of a Trump conviction in any of them, there’s no evidence yet that they’ve dented his popularity. Here are the latest GOP primary numbers and matchups with President Joe Biden.

Read moreShow less

The Graphic Truth: Trump's indictment fundraising boom

Former President Donald Trump on Thursday pleaded not guilty to four counts linked to allegations that he tried to undermine the 2020 election result and remain in power despite losing the vote.

Read moreShow less

A protester holds a banner that says "Trump indicted."

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

What makes this Trump case different?

Former President Donald Trump will appear in federal court on Thursday after being indicted by federal prosecutors for allegedly trying to overturn the 2020 election result.

(For more on what’s in the indictment, see here.)

Amid a seemingly never-ending loop of Trump legal quandaries, what makes this case different from the former president’s other legal woes?

Read moreShow less

An explosion caused by a police munition while supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump storm the U.S. Capitol Building.

REUTERS/Leah Millis

Trump charged with trying to overturn 2020 election

“Despite having lost, the Defendant was determined to remain in power.” So reads Tuesday’s federal indictment of former President Donald Trump.

The first set of charges linked to Special Counsel Jack Smith’s probe of Trump’s dealings in the weeks and months leading up to the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol riots dropped late Tuesday, and the former president faces four felony counts for allegedly trying to overturn the 2020 election. These include: conspiracy to violate civil rights, conspiracy to defraud the American government, corrupt obstruction of an official proceeding, and conspiracy to carry out such obstruction.

Read moreShow less

Subscribe to our free newsletter, GZERO Daily

Latest