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Do Donald Trump’s criminal convictions put American democracy at risk?
Do Donald Trump’s criminal convictions put American democracy at risk? | GZERO World

Do Donald Trump’s criminal convictions put American democracy at risk?

From the day former president Donald Trump took office, political analysts and Democratic leaders worried his presidency would erode democratic norms and safeguards. But even after a democratic crisis as violent and alarming as January 6, America’s democratic institutions held up. But are Trump’s guilty verdicts in the New York hush money case an even bigger threat to our democracy?On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer asks former US attorney Preet Bharara and New Yorker columnist Susan Glasser what the conviction means for the 2024 US presidential election and America’s political institutions moving forward. Both Glasser and Bharara warn that the unprecedented shattering of democratic norms can have huge implications for the health of democracy as a whole, and just America’s institutions survived crises like January 6 doesn’t guarantee they’ll remain intact in the future.
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GOP's response to Trump verdict: An "ominous sign" for the future?
GOP's response to Trump verdict: An "ominous sign" for the future? | GZERO World

GOP's response to Trump verdict: An "ominous sign" for the future?

It’s far too early to say how former President Trump’s 34 felony convictions in the New York hush money case will affect the 2024 US presidential election, but make no mistake, the verdict has far-reaching implications for the future of the Republican party.

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer was joined by New Yorker columnist Susan Glasser and former US attorney Preet Bharara for a frank look at what Trump’s conviction means for the GOP moving forward. As historic as Trump’s conviction is, the political response may be even more unprecedented and could have dangerous implications not just for Republicans or capital “D” Democrats but for our already fragile, lower-case “d” democracy.

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The US Supreme Court’s “upside-down” logic in Trump immunity case
The US Supreme Court’s “upside-down” logic in Trump immunity case

The US Supreme Court’s “upside-down” logic in Trump immunity case

2024 is certain to be a historic year for the US Supreme Court: In June, SCOTUS will issue rulings on former president Donald Trump’s immunity claims in charges brought by Special Counsel Jack Smith involving Trump’s attempts to overturn the 2020 election. Emily Bazelon joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to unpack the legal arguments at the heart of the case and what caught SCOTUS experts off-guard during oral arguments.

“It seemed going in that this was a pretty clear case,” Bazelon explains, “That Trump’s claims that he has absolute immunity for acts he committed in office is just too broad. It seemed obvious, and then it didn’t seem obvious at all.”
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Former President of the United States Donald J. Trump.

Reuters

Georgia poses new dangers for Trump

Late Monday night, Donald Trump and 18 other people were indicted by a grand jury in Atlanta for conspiring to overturn the results of the 2020 election in the state of Georgia.

Trump will face 13 felony charges. Former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, and other alleged co-conspirators are charged with taking part in a “criminal enterprise” to flip the presidential election in a crucial state.

You can read the full indictment here.

Let’s cut to the chase: Trump has already been indicted three times – in New York City, Washington, DC, and Florida – and he faces dozens of other felony charges in those cases. And though it’s too soon to know the likelihood of a Trump conviction in any of them, there’s no evidence yet that they’ve dented his popularity. Here are the latest GOP primary numbers and matchups with President Joe Biden.

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The Graphic Truth: Trump's indictment fundraising boom

Former President Donald Trump on Thursday pleaded not guilty to four counts linked to allegations that he tried to undermine the 2020 election result and remain in power despite losing the vote.

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E. Jean Carroll departs from the Manhattan Federal Court following the verdict in the civil rape accusation case against former President Donald Trump, in New York City.

REUTERS/Andrew Kelly

Trump liable for sexual abuse

It was another very bad day for former President Donald Trump on Tuesday when a jury in Manhattan found him liable for defamation and sexual abuse in a civil suit, ordering him to dole out $5 million in damages.
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Warnock's Georgia victory: Dems control every Senate Committee
Warnock's Georgia Victory: Dems Control Every Senate Committee | US Politics In :60 | GZERO Media

Warnock's Georgia victory: Dems control every Senate Committee

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, DC shares his perspective on US politics.

What does the Democratic win in the Georgia Senate race mean?

There are two major implications from Senator Raphael Warnock's victory last night in the Georgia Senate runoff. The first is that it ends the longest running tied Senate in American history and gives Democrats 51 seats and outright control of Senate committees that can be used to conduct oversight. This probably means more uncomfortable hearings for titans of industry next year and while the House will focus their oversight activities on the Biden administration, the Senate is going to be calling in bank CEOs and representatives of concentrated industries to talk about corporate profits and inflation.

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Donald Trump announces that he will once again run for US president in 2024 during an event at his Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

The world watches Trump

Americans were watching as Donald Trump announced his presidential candidacy on Tuesday night, but Trump’s entry into the race also grabbed the attention of political leaders around the globe.

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