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Biden and Trump both betting debates will make the other look bad
Trump and Biden debate plans aim to shape voter impressions | US Politics

Biden and Trump both betting debates will make the other look bad

Jon Lieber, Eurasia Group's head of research and managing director for the firm's coverage of United States political and policy developments, shares his perspective on US politics from Washington, DC.

What we're watching in US Politics this week? The big story is the debates.

The debate about the debates was going to be a prolonged affair given some uncertainty about either candidate's desire to face off against each other. And while earlier in this week it looked possible that the US might not have any presidential debates the first time in recent memory. Instead, now we know we're going to have at least two, one in June and one in September.

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The US Supreme Court’s “upside-down” logic in Trump immunity case
The US Supreme Court’s “upside-down” logic in Trump immunity case

The US Supreme Court’s “upside-down” logic in Trump immunity case

2024 is certain to be a historic year for the US Supreme Court: In June, SCOTUS will issue rulings on former president Donald Trump’s immunity claims in charges brought by Special Counsel Jack Smith involving Trump’s attempts to overturn the 2020 election. Emily Bazelon joins Ian Bremmer on GZERO World to unpack the legal arguments at the heart of the case and what caught SCOTUS experts off-guard during oral arguments.

“It seemed going in that this was a pretty clear case,” Bazelon explains, “That Trump’s claims that he has absolute immunity for acts he committed in office is just too broad. It seemed obvious, and then it didn’t seem obvious at all.”
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Israel intent on Rafah invasion despite global backlash
Israel seems intent on Rafah invasion despite global backlash | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

Israel intent on Rafah invasion despite global backlash

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

How will the international community respond to an Israeli invasion of Rafah?

Very, very badly. You see that the Israeli prime minister and War Cabinet continues to say that no matter what happens with the hostages and a potential deal, and everyone's trying to get one done at the last minute, that the intention is still very much to fight on the ground there. I don't think that's a bluff. And especially because it's supported by the entire Israeli political spectrum and the population, they believe that you've got to take out Hamas. And beyond that, there's also the concern about Hezbollah. So I think the international response is going to be very negative. It is certainly going to push back the possibility of any Saudi normalization, and it's going to lead to a lot more demonstrations and hostility against Israel in the United States and in Europe.

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In divided America, anything goes in the name of “protecting democracy"
The fractured state of US democracy | Ian Bremmer | Quick Take

In divided America, anything goes in the name of “protecting democracy"

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take: A Quick Take to kick off your Monday morning. Let's talk for a moment about the state of US politics, US democracy. It's the one thing that almost all Americans today can agree on, and that is that their political opponents at home are fundamentally opposed to democracy.

Now, that is actually something I think that unites Americans in kind of a weird way. If you are a Biden supporter, you believe that Trump and MAGA supporters are fundamentally opposed to democracy. If you are a MAGA supporter, you believe that Biden and the establishment Democrats are fundamentally opposed to American democracy. It is incredibly dysfunctional. It is no way to operate a government.

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US-Ukraine policy under Trump would be similar to Biden's
US-Ukraine policy under Trump would be similar to Biden's | Stephen Walt | GZERO World

US-Ukraine policy under Trump would be similar to Biden's

Harvard Kennedy School’s Stephen Walt suggests that there’s not as much daylight between Biden and Trump as people might think when it comes to US policy towards Ukraine.

As with Trump, Walt argues, “Biden would also be trying to end this war sooner rather than later.” But where Biden would be looking to support Ukraine in securing the best possible deal in a peace arrangement, Trump might abandon Ukraine, forcing them to rely more on European support for security.

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How the US election will change the world
How the US election will change the world | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

How the US election will change the world

What role will foreign policy play in the upcoming US presidential election? “More than it usually does,” says Harvard Kennedy School’s Stephen Walt in an interview on GZERO World with Ian Bremmer. “Partly because the economy doesn't seem to be helping Biden as much as it should be, partly because it's hard to look at Biden's foreign policy and tout a lot of big success stories."

In a wide-ranging interview comparing US foreign policy under a second Biden or Trump term, Walt suggests that they may not be as different as people expect. “On a bunch of big issues, the daylight between him and Biden just isn't that great.” It may come as little surprise that Bremmer disagrees.

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Biden vs Trump foreign policy: Political scientist Stephen Walt weighs in


Listen: On this episode of GZERO World Podcast, Ian Bremmer and Harvard Kennedy School Professor Stephen Walt discuss foreign policy differences between a second term for Biden or Trump on issues like China, Ukraine, and the Middle East. Walt argues that American foreign policy under a second Trump term wouldn’t be so different from the last four years under Biden. “The daylight may not be as great as people think,” Walt tells Ian. For instance, Walt says, “It's hard to see a big change between the Trump administration's approach to the Middle East and what the Biden administration was doing up until October 7." On China, Ukraine and the Mideast, Walt doesn’t see a big difference between the last two US presidents.

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Ian Explains: Will foreign policy decide the 2024 US election?
Will foreign policy decide the 2024 US election? | Ian Bremmer explains | GZERO World

Ian Explains: Will foreign policy decide the 2024 US election?

How much does foreign policy matter in a US presidential election? This year, more than usual.

When pollsters started asking Americans in 1948 what they viewed as the “most important problem” facing the country, foreign policy and international security dominated.

Looking ahead to the 2024 presidential election, Biden has managed to turn a Covid-ravaged economy around, with growth pegged at about three percent per quarter. Wages are going up, unemployment is at an all-time low and the stock market is coming on strongly. By every economic indicator, Biden should be surging. And yet, by every political indicator, he’s floundering.

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