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Next Steps for a World at a Make-Or-Break Moment | Davos 2022 | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Next steps for a world at a make-or-break moment: Davos 2022

For years, titans of industry and government have visited the tiny alpine village of Davos in Switzerland to discuss how to fix the world's problems.

They pushed a globalist agenda, promoting things like liberal democracy and cooperation to address big problems like climate change.

But less people are buying what Davos is selling in 2022. Blame the pandemic and Russia's war in Ukraine. So, what were the main takeaways at this year's geopolitical WEF?

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer speaks to thought leaders at this year's World Economic Forum:
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Podcast: When allies unified by Ukraine confront upended security & war fatigue

Listen: At the 2022 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, it was clear that history is at a turning point, with a war in Europe whose cascading impact can be felt all over the globe. But this year’s WEF wasn’t just about the many crises we’re facing. It was also a referendum on the forum itself, and the strength of the multilateral values it defends. Ian Bremmer speaks to thought leaders at Davos on the GZERO World podcast. Wolfgang Ischinger, former German Ambassador to the US, thinks the world is in pretty good shape, but worries about Ukraine. Venezuela's former trade minister Moises Naim believes that world affairs are causing great uncertainty around the globe. Journalist and chair of the editorial board at the Financial Times, Gillian Tett, applauds Ukraine for its efforts to rally support for their cause.

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform, to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

Ian Explains: What Happened at Davos | GZERO World

What happened at Davos

The tiny alpine village of Davos in Switzerland used to be the place to be for some of the world's most powerful people to talk about very important stuff at the annual World Economic Forum.

Indeed, the name “Davos” had become code for a globalist agenda that promotes things like liberal democracy and encourages cooperation on big issues such as climate change to fix the world's problems.

For a long time, it worked. People became more connected, and poverty declined. But not anymore, Ian Bremmer explains on GZERO World.

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The Yet-Unseen Consequences of Russia's War in Ukraine | Global Stage | GZERO Media

The yet-unseen consequences of Russia's war in Ukraine

World leaders attending the 2022 World Economic Forum in Davos know there's a crisis going on — but Ian Bremmer thinks they are still unaware of the first- and second-order consequences of Russia's war in Ukraine.

First, "people are mostly thinking about this as a war inside Ukraine. It's not a war in Ukraine. It's actually a war between Russia and NATO," the president of GZERO Media said Global Stage livestream conversation hosted by GZERO in partnership with Microsoft.

What's more, he explained, NATO is doing everything it can to degrade Russia's capabilities and welcoming Finland and Sweden, so very soon "NATO and Russia are going to be in some level of not just cold war, but have some aspects of [a] hot war."

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Highlights from Davos 2022 | Global Stage | GZERO Media

Highlights from Davos 2022

World leaders gathered this week in Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum at a moment of heightened global uncertainty.

Three months into the Russian war in Ukraine, the conflict seems no closer to resolution. A global food crisis — made worse by the war — is putting more than a billion people at risk of food insecurity. Meanwhile, cyberattacks and misinformation continue to wreak havoc around the globe.

The world faces many dangerous challenges, but the biggest one may be this: “you can’t solve a problem unless you agree on what the problem is,” says GZERO’s Ian Bremmer.

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Latin America Faces Perfect Storm for Nasty Politics | Moisés Naim | Global Stage | GZERO Media

Moisés Naim: With inflation & low trust in democracy, Latin America faces perfect storm for nasty politics

How much power does the World Economic Forum in Davos still have? For Moisés Naim. distinguished fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, not much, and this year's leitmotif is confusion. Why? "We are dealing with uncertain situations that have no precedent," he tells Ian Bremmer in a Global Stage interview. Naim believes that in the near future the locus of power will shift from geography to artificial intelligence, which will have immense consequences for how leaders wield power — and that's a double-edged sword. And what about Latin America's future? He sees a"very dangerous convergence of inflation and disappointment with democracy that could result in "a perfect storm to create nasty politics" in the region.

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Ukraine Made German Foreign Policy Go “Out the Window” | Global Stage | GZERO Media

Wolfgang Ischinger: Ukraine made German foreign policy go "out the window"

For Wolfgang Ischinger, former chair of the Munich Security Conference, the state of transatlantic relations is in good shape right now, although whether we'll have the stamina to stay on course is uncertain. In a Global Stage interview with Ian Bremmer, he seems more worried about American war fatigue than the Europeans — although the EU has Viktor Orbán and it's hard for Germany to cut off Russian gas. One lesson Ischinger has learned from the current crisis is that Europe must have America's back on China, especially with Taiwan. And he calls German Chancellor Olaf Scholz's recent foreign policy U-turns as "going out the window."

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Gillian Tett: Ukraine Know How To Get What It Wants From the West | Global Stage | GZERO Media

Gillian Tett: Ukraine knows how to get what it wants from the West

The World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, is not known for big outbursts of human emotion. But this year, the Ukrainian delegation got a standing ovation from the usual crowd of global business leaders. Gillian Tett, US editor-at-large and chair of the Financial Times board, met with the Ukrainians and shares her perspective with Ian Bremmer in a Global Stage interview. Beyond all the emotion, Tett also believes that when the fighting is over, there will eventually be business opportunities for many people present. She also commented on chatter about using sanctions against Russia to confiscate assets and use them to compensate Ukraine, which she sees as a slippery slope because there are many doubts about due process.
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