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What does Brexit mean for the UK, London, and NYC? Will McConnell allow a US stimulus payment vote?

Brexit will be here on January 1st. What big changes are coming?

There are a lot of big changes coming. Most important for the average Brit is the fact that you no longer can work or have education access in the European Union. You have to apply with normal immigration patterns, as you would outside the EU. That's going to change the way people think about their future. But otherwise, a lot greater regulatory impact, declarations of customs for goods being transmitted, so the cost of trade is going to go up with the world's largest common market. You know, the idea of I mean, for financial markets is very important because you have financial groups that are losing automatic access to the single market in the EU as well. They're supposed to be new deals cut around that, but we aren't there yet. It's not a disaster, but the fact that all these changes are happening immediately, and they are a significant cost primarily on the smaller economy of the United Kingdom and that they're going to have to be borne at a time when the economy's not doing well, when coronavirus hasn't been handled very well, when global demand is already depressed, this is a big hit, and it's a big hit also on the back of almost five years of uncertainty around the UK.

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"It's done" — EU, UK avoid no-deal Brexit

Four and a half years after Britons voted to leave the EU, the missed deadlines and last-minute shenanigans are finally over. Just a week out from the December 31 deadline, when Great Britain would have crashed out of the European Union without a trade deal, the EU and the UK today announced they had reached an agreement on post-Brexit trade — the full details of which will become public in coming days.

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What We're Watching: Britain's new COVID strain, US Congress reaches stimulus deal, Nepal's political chaos

Britain's new COVID strain: Just as the Brexit transition comes to an end and the United Kingdom prepares to leave the European Union on January 1, Britons now face a new form of isolation. Countries in Europe, the Middle East, Latin America, Asia and elsewhere have banned travelers from the UK in response to reports that a variant of the novel coronavirus is raging out of control in that country. The (relative) good news is that, though this COVID-19 variant appears more infectious than the strain it has replaced, there is no evidence to date that it's more deadly or more resistant to the vaccines now in use in the UK. The bad news is that there will be more people flooding into British hospitals, and the virus variant is another factor undermining economic and financial confidence in the UK at a time when its leap into the Brexit unknown already threatens market turmoil.

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Can Europe trust the US - or its own nations? A top German diplomat's view

GZERO World examines the current state of transatlantic partnerships between the US and Europe following four years of Trump's presidency, and whether or not the incoming Biden Administration can restore trust that the US is a willing and reliable ally. Ian Bremmer's guest is one of Germany's most accomplished diplomats, Wolfgang Ischinger, who has served as ambassador to both the US and the UK. His new book, World in Danger: Germany and Europe in an Uncertain Time, explores the current state of the EU and its place in global affairs as the UK prepares for its "BREXIT" and China looms large in the geopolitical landscape.

Podcast: Can Europe trust the US - or its own nations? A top German diplomat's view

Listen: The GZERO World podcast examines the current state of transatlantic partnerships between the US and Europe following four years of Trump's presidency, and whether or not the incoming Biden Administration can restore trust that the US is a willing and reliable ally. Ian Bremmer's guest is one of Germany's most accomplished diplomats, Wolfgang Ischinger, who has served as ambassador to both the US and the UK. His new book, World in Danger: Germany and Europe in an Uncertain Time, explores the current state of the EU and its place in global affairs as the UK prepares for its "BREXIT" and China looms large in the geopolitical landscape.

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