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A supporter of former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva reacts as people gather after polling stations were closed in the presidential election in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

REUTERS/Amanda Perobelli

What We're Watching: Brazilian runoff, Burkina Faso coup 2.0, Ukraine's response to Russian annexations

Lula’s bittersweet first-round win

Left-wing former President Luiz Inácio "Lula" da Silva won the first round of Brazil's presidential election on Sunday but fell short of the outright majority needed to avoid an Oct. 30 runoff that might now be tighter than expected. With almost 97% of the ballots counted, Lula got 47.9% of the vote, 4.2 percentage points more than his nemesis: the far-right incumbent President Jair Bolsonaro. Although Lula is still favored to also win in the second round, the result is good news for Bolsonaro because he outperformed the polls, which had him trailing Lula by a wide margin and led many to believe his rival could win it all in the first round. Some experts think that Bolsonaro is consistently underestimated because many Brazilians are hesitant to admit they vote for him — a theory pollsters deny. Lula's narrower-than-expected victory might give Bolsonaro even more fodder to claim that the surveys are rigged against him. Brazil's president has spent months firing up his base with baseless doubts about the integrity of the election process, and no one would be surprised if he tries to pull a 6 de Janeiro if he loses the runoff.

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Protest against the coup in Myanmar in front of the country's embassy in Bangkok, Thailand.

REUTERS/Athit Perawongmetha

Myanmar generals turn back the clock

After weeks of saber-rattling, Myanmar's military took power on Monday. Aung San Suu Kyi and the entire leadership of her incumbent National League for Democracy party are now under arrest. The coup ends a five-year democratic experiment in a country where generals are used to calling the shots.

How did we get here, why was democracy so short-lived, and what happens next?

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No one wants a coup, says Thai PM as rumours and protests persist

October 31, 2020 5:00 AM

BANGKOK • Thailand's Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha, facing pressure amid expanding protests calling for his ouster, told reporters yesterday that "no one wants to stage a coup".

Malaysia's Rome Statute withdrawal due to risk of coup attempt: Saifuddin

April 07, 2019 12:14 PM

KUALA LUMPUR - Malaysia's decision to withdraw from ratifying the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (ICC) was a political move made to avoid a coup attempt, Foreign Minister Saifuddin Abdullah said in a media interview on Saturday (April 6).

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