{{ subpage.title }}

Florida law would fine social media companies for censoring politicians

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

What is the deal with the new Florida law that fines social media companies for censoring politicians?

Well, it's a deal of Floridian politics, it is informed by Republican anger about the banning of President Trump off of Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube. But the last word has not been said about the new law. Challenges based on companies' first amendment rights, as well as compatibility with current intermediary liability exemptions, like Section 230, will probably be fought out in court.

Read Now Show less

'Monster Hunter' movie pulled in China after race row

December 08, 2020 4:35 PM

A brief line of dialogue was targeted by Chinese social media users as racist.

The appeal of free speech social media platforms like Parler

Watch as Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, explains what's going on in technology news:

What is Parler? Why are people moving off Facebook to new social sites?

Parler is like Twitter, except it was set up very specifically to make it so that the owners of the site, the people who run it, would not censor your speech, or put another way, would not take action to remove hateful or harmful speech. It is a free speech social media platform that is primarily used by people on the political right. Why are people moving off Facebook to new social sites? I don't think that many are. People talk about moving off, but to the extent they are, it's because they feel like the sites are censoring them.

Read Now Show less

FCC wants to change Section 230 regulating tech companies & censorship

Nicholas Thompson, editor-in-chief of WIRED, shares his perspective on technology news in Tech In (a little over) 60 Seconds:

What is the deal with Twitter and Facebook censoring a New York Post story on Hunter Biden?

The New York Post ran a story on Hunter Biden. It may have been entirely false. It may have been hacked. Both of those things are problems. But the complicated thing is when the story ran, nobody at Facebook and nobody at Twitter knew whether it was false or whether it had been hacked. The two companies responded in different ways. Facebook said, we're just going to down-rank it. Twitter initially said, "we just won't let it be shared." Twitter then backtracked. Basically, there is a really hard problem of what you do with false information and what you do with hacked information. Neither company has totally clear policies and both got caught in the slipstream.

Read Now Show less

Pakistan to block social media app TikTok for 'immoral' content

October 09, 2020 8:54 PM

ISLAMABAD (REUTERS) - Pakistan has decided to block social media App TikTok for failing to filter out "immoral"content, three top government officials said on Friday (Oct 9).

Thailand takes first legal action against Facebook, Twitter over content

September 24, 2020 2:52 PM

BANGKOK (REUTERS) - Thailand began legal action on Thursday (Sept 24) against Facebook and Twitter for ignoring requests to take down content, in its first such move against major Internet firms.

Chinese censorship intensifying: Study

September 06, 2020 5:00 AM

Censorship in China has intensified in recent months, with Beijing grappling with the Covid-19 pandemic and increasingly fraught relations with the United States.

Myanmar blocks activist website for fake news

September 01, 2020 8:56 PM

NAYPYITAW (REUTERS) - Myanmar's Telecommunications Ministry said on Tuesday (Sept 1) it had ordered mobile operators to block a website run by activists investigating the military for spreading fake news, which the group said was a bid to silence critical voices.

Subscribe to GZERO Media's newsletter, Signal

Latest