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How the Supreme Court immunity ruling changes presidential power
Supreme Court's immunity protects Trump from Jan. 6 prosecution | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

How the Supreme Court immunity ruling changes presidential power

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

What does the Supreme Court's immunity decision mean for Trump and the future of presidential power?

Well, for Trump, the first thing it means is that you're not going to be hearing about on the case of his involvement in January 6th. All of that gets punted until after the election earliest, assuming Biden wins and more likely these days, Trump. The case is kind of a dead letter. More broadly for presidential power. We're talking about immunity for all official acts that are engaged in during the course of a person's presidency. Now, in dissent, Justice Sotomayor, who's pretty far left on the court, has said that this doesn't prevent a president from engaging in treasonous acts and makes the president a king. Most jurists don't accept that, but it certainly does lead to huge questions about what is and what is not an official act. And of course, presidents would be inclined to argue that very broadly to be able to avoid the potential at any cases against them. So this is a pretty significant, not necessary momentous, but certainly very significant decision by the court.

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Ian Bremmer on debate: A big loss for Biden
Ian Bremmer on Trump-Biden debate | Quick Take

Ian Bremmer on debate: A big loss for Biden

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take: Hi, everybody. Ian Bremmer here. It is late, and we have just seen the first, maybe the last presidential debate of 2024. I was skeptical about the strategy from day one of Biden getting on stage with Trump. Biden has never been a great campaigner, doesn't have a lot of discipline, and isn't enormously entertaining. But they decided they needed to do it. And the rules benefited a normal politician. The microphones shut off, except for the person who was allowed to speak, and there was no live audience, and it was CNN. So the questions are going to be, at the very least, balance between the two. And, if there's going to be a slant, it'll be towards Biden and not towards Trump. And despite all of that, Biden got absolutely pasted.

And it's not about his speaking points per se; there were some points that he made, if you just look at the transcript, that clearly was in his favor, I would say, on balance, on the economy, his command of the facts was stronger than that of Trump. I saw that, in terms of talk of inflation and jobs. I saw that in terms of China and the trade deficit with China, that's actually narrowed as opposed to increased. Certainly, on abortion, I think that Biden would have landed more punches if you were only looking at the transcript. But no one is looking at the transcript. They're looking at the performance. And the performance, Biden was abysmal.

It wasn't just like a little bit on Trump's side. Trump looked vibrant. He actually, largely played by the rules. He sounded strong. He stuck to his time limit. And Biden looked and occasionally sounded incoherent. And the reality is that, I mean, Trump, in my view, shouldn't be running because he's unfit for being president. Biden shouldn't be running because he is too old to stand. And of the two challenges, the latter looks a lot worse on the debate stage that 50 plus percent of Americans just watched. The inbound that I've been receiving over the last two hours from people all over the world is overwhelmingly: "Is Biden now going to stand down? What is going to happen?" Because this is the worst evening, certainly of his campaign, and the level of pressure to find someone, anyone else other than Biden, to run is going to be strong.

Hunter Biden's convictions won't derail his father's re-election bid
Hunter Biden's convictions won't derail his father's re-election bid | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

Hunter Biden's convictions won't derail his father's re-election bid

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60, live from the Toronto US-Canada Summit.

What are the implications of Hunter Biden's convictions for his father's presidential campaign?

You know, it's a little bit of tit for tat. You're going to see a lot of Republicans saying, “See the Biden crime family! Look at this guy. I mean, he's a convict.” It's ugly. It's embarrassing for the Biden family, of course. But at the same time, it's not very significant charges and it certainly doesn't link directly to President Biden. Five months away, are people going to be talking about this or Trump's 34 convictions, the weakest of the cases that he's actually facing? I suspect neither of them are going to matter very much, even though, on balance, Trump's is the one that should matter more.

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Hunter Biden's trial shows the US criminal justice system is working
Hunter Biden's trial shows the US criminal justice system is working | GZERO World

Hunter Biden's trial shows the US criminal justice system is working

Republican lawmakers are attacking the US criminal justice system as “rigged” and “shameful” after former president Donald Trump’s criminal convictions, calling the case a blatant example of political persecution. But in a twist of legal happenstance, Hunter Biden’s criminal trial began in Delaware just days after the Trump verdict was announced.

On GZERO World, Ian Bremmer sits down with former US attorney Preet Bharara and New Yorker columnist Susan Glasser for their reaction to Trump’s unprecedented conviction, the even more unprecedented GOP response, and whether Republican accusations of a “two-tiered” justice system and political witch hunt holds water. In a stunning twist of legal irony, President Biden’s son, Hunter Biden, is currently on trial for lying about paperwork he used to purchase a gun in Delaware.
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