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Taliban, Afghan people face economic collapse, says former central bank chief

With Afghanistan's US-held assets and most foreign aid frozen, the currency in freefall, bank cash withdrawals limited and food prices surging, former Afghan central bank chief Ajmal Ahmady says the Taliban could soon run out of money to run the country. When that happens, they'll have to cut services, so "the Afghan people are undeniably going to be hurt."

Watch his interview with Ian Bremmer on a new episode of GZERO World, airing on US public television starting Friday, September 3. Check local listings.

Colombia's humanitarian gesture for Venezuelan refugees merits US support

Ian Bremmer shares his perspective on global politics on this week's World In (More Than) 60 Seconds:

Number one, why did Colombia's president grant legal status to 1.7 million Venezuelan migrants?

Well, because they have them, first of all. Because given the extraordinary economic collapse and the human rights abuses of Venezuelans under the Maduro presidency, not to mention the coronavirus crisis making their lives even worse, they've been fleeing, and most of them have ended up in Colombia. Not providing legal status means they can't work, means they have no path for a future. Some of them have even fled back to Venezuela or returned to Venezuela, and again just shows just how critically difficult their life has been. It's a humanitarian gesture of pretty staggering degree. It makes an enormous difference in the lives of these people. Think about how the United States under Biden now preparing to accept 125,000 refugees per year, up 10 times from what it was just a year ago, the world's most powerful country. The wealthy countries never get overwhelmed with refugees the way the poorest countries do. It's states in Sub-Saharan Africa and it's South and Southeast Asia and it's Latin America, and in the Western hemisphere, it's been Colombia.

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Rebels, rivals, and proxies in the Central African Republic

A bitter war is raging again inside a country that is simultaneously one of the world's richest and poorest — and outside players are part of it.

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