{{ subpage.title }}

Export Controls Are “Worst Possible” Thing To Do in Food Crisis | Global Stage | GZERO Media

In a food crisis, export controls are "worst possible" thing to do, says UN Foundation chief

The war in Ukraine has aggravated a global food crisis that started with the pandemic. Is there anything we can do about it?

The UN is trying, but there needs to be a much more ambitious response to what is already a catastrophic humanitarian crisis, UN Foundation President Elizabeth Cousens said during a Global Stage livestream discussion hosted by GZERO in partnership with Microsoft at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. She was joined by Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media; Brad Smith, president and vice chair of Microsoft; and moderator Nicholas Thompson, CEO of The Atlantic.

Read Now Show less
Afghan Humanitarian Crisis is the West’s Fault, Says Pakistan’s Hina Khar | GZERO World

US has set the stage for Afghanistan’s humanitarian disaster, says Hina Khar

Afghans are starving. Not just because the Taliban are now in charge, according to Pakistan's former top diplomat.

“Of course, people are talking about the starving Afghan people who need our help,” Hina Khar told Ian Bremmer in a GZERO World interview at the 2022 Munich Security Conference. “But that's the white man's burden — not accepting what you did wrong in creating the situation that is starving the Afghans right now.”

Read Now Show less

Podcast: US choices, global consequences: Hina Khar on India, Pakistan, Afghanistan & broken democracy


Listen: As Russian forces invaded Ukraine, Pakistan's PM Imran Khan, one of Vladimir Putin’s few friends, visited Moscow. But his trip did not go down well in the US. With Washington ready to downgrade its relationship with Islamabad, Khan is looking to form new friendships to protect Pakistan's strategic interests. In this episode of the GZERO World Podcast, Ian Bremmer talks to Pakistan’s former Foreign Minister Hina Rabbani Khar about Pakistan’s future, Afghanistan, and India. Who bears responsibility for the Afghan humanitarian crisis? Military interventions, Khar says, cast a “deep shadow on the entire democratic value system.” She argues that the best way to help end Afghanistan’s humanitarian crisis is to talk to the Taliban. Pakistan's former top diplomat also says it's time for her country to take a step back from the global stage to focus on its mounting domestic challenges and concentrate on issues like reducing Pakistan's huge dependence on foreign aid and moves in Kashmir. Khar asserts that India is also endangering regional politics as a member of the Quad.

Listen to Ian Bremmer's interview with Hina Rabbani Khar.

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform, to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

Inequity and Conflict in Yemen | UN's David Gressly | GZERO World

Inequity and conflict in Yemen: interview with UN's David Gressly

Why you should remember Yemen’s forgotten war In Yemen, the world’s biggest humanitarian crisis you’ve probably never heard of, 80 percent of people need international aid just to survive.

Two-thirds are hungry, and half don’t know where their next meal will come from.

Life is very hard in Yemen, UN Resident Coordinator David Gressly tells Ian Bremmer. Most infrastructure is destroyed, few can access clean water or health care, and many Yemenis are afraid to go outside because of landmines.

Meanwhile, 1.2 civil servants continue to show up to work, with little or no pay. If they stayed home, the state would cease to exist. The UN is asking for $3.6 billion simply to feed Yemenis and keep the lights on through 2022, but is now still short $1.6 billion. Gressly says that means many Yemenis will go hungry next year.

Regional powers Iran and Saudi Arabia have turned Yemen into a seven-year proxy war, with civilians paying the price. The country is divided between the Houthis, an Iran-backed Shia militant group, and the internationally recognized government with Saudi Arabia on its side.

It’s unlikely the conflict will end anytime soon. The Biden administration has delisted the Houthis as a terrorist organization and stopped selling weapons to the Saudis. Gressly thinks that’s a step in the right direction, but not enough.

Watch the episode of GZERO World on Yemen's forgotten war: https://www.gzeromedia.com/gzero-world-with-ian-bremmer/caught-in-the-crossfire-yemens-forgotten-war

| GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Caught in the crossfire: Yemen’s forgotten war

In Yemen, the world’s biggest humanitarian crisis you’ve probably never heard of, 80 percent of people need international aid just to survive. Two-thirds are hungry, and half don’t know where their next meal will come from.

Life is very hard in Yemen, UN Resident Coordinator David Gressly tells Ian Bremmer. Most infrastructure is destroyed, few can access clean water or health care, and many Yemenis are afraid to go outside because of landmines.

Meanwhile, 1.2 million civil servants continue to show up to work, with little or no pay. If they stayed home, the state would cease to exist.

Read Now Show less

Podcast: The human tragedy of Yemen’s intractable civil war


Listen: After 7 years of conflict, Yemen is often called the world’s worst humanitarian crisis. Ian Bremmer speaks with UN Resident Coordinator David Gressly about the dire situation in Yemen, where half of the population doesn’t know when they will eat their next meal. Seen as a proxy war between the Saudis and the Iranians, civilians are caught in the crosshairs.

Subscribe to the GZERO World Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or your preferred podcast platform to receive new episodes as soon as they're published.

Living in Yemen's "Devastating" Civil War | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Living in Yemen's "devastating" civil war

Life is very hard today in Yemen, the country with the worst humanitarian crisis you may not have heard about lately.

UN Resident Coordinator David Gressly paints a grim picture of destroyed infrastructure and people scared of moving around. There are so many landmines, he says, that many Yemenis stay away from health clinics and schools because they fear being killed or maimed.

And every year the war drags on, it gets worse.

Read Now Show less
Taliban, Afghan People Face Economic Collapse, Says Former Central Bank Chief | GZERO World

Taliban, Afghan people face economic collapse, says former central bank chief

With Afghanistan's US-held assets and most foreign aid frozen, the currency in freefall, bank cash withdrawals limited and food prices surging, former Afghan central bank chief Ajmal Ahmady says the Taliban could soon run out of money to run the country. When that happens, they'll have to cut services, so "the Afghan people are undeniably going to be hurt."

Watch his interview with Ian Bremmer on a new episode of GZERO World, airing on US public television starting Friday, September 3. Check local listings.

Subscribe to GZERO Media's newsletter, Signal

Latest