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Displaced Palestinian woman Mai Anseir stands with children at a school where they shelter as they prepare to flee Rafah after Israeli forces launched a ground and air operation in the eastern part of the southern Gaza City, amid the ongoing conflict between Israel and Hamas, in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip May 13, 2024.

REUTERS/Mohammed Salem

Hard Numbers: Waves of Palestinians displaced, Deadly cartel violence in Mexico, Fatal riots in New Caledonia, Biden sanctions Nicaragua, Israeli soldiers killed by friendly fire

500,000: Over half a million people have been displaced in Gaza by recent Israeli military operations in Rafah and the northern part of the enclave, according to the UN. As the Israel-Hamas war rages on, over a million people in Gaza are on the verge of starvation, and a “full-blown famine” is occurring in the north.

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Xi invites Putin to China to strengthen "no limits" partnership
Putin visits Xi to continue "no-limit" relationship with China | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

Xi invites Putin to China to strengthen "no limits" partnership

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

Does Putin's upcoming visit with Xi Jinping signal a continuing “no limits” partnership between China and Russia?

The relationship is certainly becoming more strategic over time. Not so much because the Russians are changing their behavior. They have very few options at this point. North Korea and Iran are their top allies. Belarus, Syria. I mean, it's a rogues’ gallery, but China is increasingly finding that their ability to work long term in a stable and sustainable way with America's allies in Asia, with the Europeans, and with the United States itself becoming more constrained. And given all of that, willingness to be a closer ally with Russia is increasing over time. Just look at Biden putting 100% tariffs on Chinese electric vehicle exports. All of this is sending a message to the Chinese that no matter who's elected in November, that the US is trying to contain them. And yeah, I think longer term, the more they see that from the US and their allies, the closer with the Russians they will eventually be.

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FILE PHOTO: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu speaks with Minister of Finance Bezalel Smotrich during the weekly cabinet meeting at the Defence Ministry in Tel Aviv, Israel, January 7, 2024.

REUTERS/Ronen Zvulun/Pool/File Photo

Netanyahu fires back at Biden over arms threat

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahusaid Thursday his country would “stand alone” and fight “with its fingernails” if Joe Biden followed through on a threat to cut certain arms shipments to the Jewish state.

A day earlier, Biden said he’d stop sending certain kinds of shells, bombs, and other offensive weapons to Israel if Netanyahu proceeded with an invasion of the southern Gaza city of Rafah, where more than a million Palestinians, many displaced from elsewhere in Gaza, are currently sheltering as famine spreads across the strip.

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President Joe Biden speaks at a Holocaust remembrance ceremony at the US Capitol on May 7, 2024.

Allison Bailey/NurPhoto via Reuters

Biden’s “ironclad” support for Israel faces its sternest test

President Joe Biden has what appears to be a political mission impossible: finding a thread that unites the pearls of Democrat support over the war in Gaza.

The Israeli military has started pushing into Rafah, despite US warnings against ground operations. That will exacerbate political strains at home for Biden as he tries to hold together his coalition of forceful progressives, who are critical of Israel, and steadfast moderates, who support the Jewish state.

Eurasia Group US Director Clayton Allen said the decision to delay delivery of some offensive weapons, specifically systems that would be utilized in an expanded offensive in Rafah, while at the same time leaning into his public statements of support for Israel, reinforced the untenable nature of the U.S. position.

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Palestinians inspect the site of an Israeli strike on a house, amid the ongoing conflict between Israel and the Palestinian Islamist group Hamas, in Rafah, in the southern Gaza Strip May 7, 2024.

REUTERS/Hatem Khaled

Biden threatens to cut off some weapons to Israel if Rafah invaded

“We’re not going to supply the weapons and the artillery shells used” in a seemingly imminent Israeli invasion of Rafah, US President Joe Biden said in a CNN interview Wednesday, his toughest language on Israel yet.

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With a Rafah invasion, is the Israel-Hamas cease-fire dead?
Rafah invasion: Did Israel violate any cease-fire agreement? | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

With a Rafah invasion, is the Israel-Hamas cease-fire dead?

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

With Israel beginning its invasion of Rafah, is the recent Hamas agreed to cease-fire dead?

No. Though, of course, it was never really alive. Wasn't alive because the Israelis didn't agree to the terms that the Palestinians and Hamas did. But they are still negotiating and Israel's initial foray across the border to take over the crossing in Gaza is not, considered a redline, by the Americans, though it is disrupting humanitarian aid, and it's certainly not a full fledged invasion. So, I mean, again, escalation, lots of warnings, expectation that invasion is going to ensue quickly. But still a possibility that you get a short term cease-fire, a short term cease-fire. We'll see.

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Displaced Palestinians, who fled Rafah after the Israeli military began evacuating civilians from the eastern parts of the southern Gazan city, ahead of a threatened assault, amid the ongoing conflict between Israel and Hamas, travel on a vehicle, in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip May 6, 2024.

REUTERS/Ramadan Abed

Hamas accepts cease-fire proposal, but Israel still strikes Rafah

On Tuesday, the Israeli military reported its tanks had rolled into Rafah and established control over the Gaza side of the border crossing with Egypt. The incursion was more restrained than the long-threatened ground invasion was expected to be, likely because Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is facing pressure to agree to a cease-fire with Hamas, which is backed by the United States and Arab nations.

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Israel intent on Rafah invasion despite global backlash
Israel seems intent on Rafah invasion despite global backlash | Ian Bremmer | World In :60

Israel intent on Rafah invasion despite global backlash

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

How will the international community respond to an Israeli invasion of Rafah?

Very, very badly. You see that the Israeli prime minister and War Cabinet continues to say that no matter what happens with the hostages and a potential deal, and everyone's trying to get one done at the last minute, that the intention is still very much to fight on the ground there. I don't think that's a bluff. And especially because it's supported by the entire Israeli political spectrum and the population, they believe that you've got to take out Hamas. And beyond that, there's also the concern about Hezbollah. So I think the international response is going to be very negative. It is certainly going to push back the possibility of any Saudi normalization, and it's going to lead to a lot more demonstrations and hostility against Israel in the United States and in Europe.

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