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Russia has no endgame — but it's not out of the game (yet)
Russia Has No Endgame — But It’s Not Out of the Game (Yet) | GZERO World

Russia has no endgame — but it's not out of the game (yet)

Russia's war in Ukraine upended geopolitics in 2022. And its fallout will extend into 2023.

The one thing that keeps international relations expert Tom Nichols up at night is that there's no endgame for Russia, a permanent member of the UN Security Council turned nuclear-armed rogue state.

On GZERO World with Ian Bremmer, former US State Department official Anne-Marie Slaughter pushes back, arguing that while Russia may have gone rogue for the West, much of the rest of the world is still happy to deal with Moscow.

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2022 has been rough. Will 2023 be any better?
2022 Has Been Rough. Will 2023 Be Any Better? | Global Stage | GZERO Media

2022 has been rough. Will 2023 be any better?

2022 has been the year of converging crises: the ongoing pandemic, climate change, economic turmoil, and Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Lots of gloom and doom, indeed.

But in all these crises, there is an opportunity to bounce back with solutions to make the world a better place. Think of how the war in Ukraine united the West more than ever against a common enemy.

How? Good question. We asked several experts during the Global Stage livestream conversation "The Road to 2030: Getting Global Goals Back on Track," hosted by GZERO in partnership with Microsoft.

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Episode 5: Could today’s crisis lead to future growth?

Transcript

Listen: “Geopolitics and their impact on the markets are greater right now than at any point in my professional life,” said Ian Bremmer, president of Eurasia Group and GZERO Media.

In this episode of “Living Beyond Borders,” a special GZERO podcast series brought to you by Citi Private Bank, we’re looking at the current state of the global economy. Gas prices are skyrocketing, supply chain issues abound, and we’re facing a bear market that has sent stock prices tumbling.

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Episode 1: If the economy is good, why do I feel so bad?

Transcript

Listen: Last year the US economy grew 5.7%, the biggest growth rate in decades, yet at the beginning of 2022 fewer than 1 in 5 Americans thought it was strong. And as the world confronts the converging crises of pandemic and war in Ukraine, inflation and skyrocketing prices are further contributing to feelings of financial insecurity.

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EU 2022: COVID waves, Russia & Ukraine, and French presidential elections
EU 2022: COVID, Russia & Ukraine, and French Presidential Elections | Europe In :60 | GZERO Media

EU 2022: COVID waves, Russia & Ukraine, and French presidential elections

Carl Bildt, former Prime Minister and Foreign Minister of Sweden, shares his perspective from Europe:

Another year of the pandemic has passed. We are in a new wave in Europe, and that is dominating quite a lot of the politics of different countries.

But as we are looking ahead towards the next year, what do we see there?

We hope the pandemic will gradually fade away, but that is by no means certain. We do face a lot of worries of what's happening in the east of Europe, the intention of Russia. Will Putin really launch a major invasion of Ukraine, or a minor military operation? Or it’s just sheer blackmail under military pressure? I think the first weeks, the first months of next year will be decisive in that particular respect.

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Can political leadership prevent cyberattacks in 2022?
Positive Changes in Cyber World for 2022 | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

Can political leadership prevent cyberattacks in 2022?

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

What are the positive changes in 2022 that we might expect to see in the cyber world?

Well, my hope is that more awareness of the harms of cyberattacks and intrusions on people will lead to stronger political leadership towards better prevention and accountability. Because too often criminals or states that attack others for their own gains simply get away with it. Only when we appreciate that the digital realm is not a universe detached from our own lives, and that attacks lead to patients sent away at hospitals, to food not reaching grocery stores, or fuel not being available at gas stations, we see more political concern over the systemic weakness throughout the technological system and ecosystem. We use both in everyday, mundane context or in very sensitive ones.


US in 2022: Smarter social media, more housing & living with COVID
Positive Changes Expected to Help Shift the US in 2022 | US Politics In :60 | GZERO Media

US in 2022: Smarter social media, more housing & living with COVID

Jon Lieber, head of Eurasia Group's coverage of political and policy developments in Washington, discusses social media, US housing market, and learning to live with COVID-19:

What are three profound changes that you would foresee that will shift the nation in a good way?

Well, it's kind of hard to be optimistic when you spend too much time looking at US politics, but I'll give you three things I think would help. One, and that will help, one, Americans are going to get smarter about social media. A quiet storyline this year has been an ongoing investigation in Congress into the harm that can be caused by unfettered access to social media platforms. A whistleblower came forward with some evidence from some of the tech companies suggesting that too much time on social media can be harmful, particularly for teen girls. And I think parents are going to start to get smarter about this issue. There won't be legislation, and this will be a slow process. While unfettered 24-7 human contact has been great in many ways, it also has a dark side, and these kinds of congressional investigations will help give parents new tools to help deal with that.

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Biggest cybersecurity threat to watch in 2022
What Will Be the Biggest Cyber Threats in 2022? | Cyber In :60 | GZERO Media

Biggest cybersecurity threat to watch in 2022

Marietje Schaake, International Policy Director at Stanford's Cyber Policy Center, Eurasia Group senior advisor and former MEP, discusses trends in big tech, privacy protection and cyberspace:

What do you foresee to be the biggest cyber threat and crisis for the year 2022?

Well, to me, the blind trust in commercially made software and technologies, remains an enormous systems risk, because over and over again, we hear of vulnerabilities in thus far, unknown small elements of widely used software that is weaponized.

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