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Biden looks to Europe (and beyond) for help to contain China

Former US ambassador Ivo Daalder calls Biden the "most Atlanticist" president since George HW Bush. Daalder defines Atlanticism as looking towards Europe first when problems arise. Getting not only the Europeans but also Asian leaders on board is vital in order for Biden to stand up to China effectively, Daalder tells Ian Bremmer in an interview on GZERO World. "It's no longer enough to be Atlanticist. You can't do your entire foreign policy engagement only with Europe. What you really need is you need a Northern American, Asian, European advanced democratic alignment."

Watch the GZERO World episode: Has Biden convinced the G7 "America is back"?

A short history of the G7

President Biden's first G7 Summit as America's President also marks the first time those world leaders have gathered in person since the start of the COVID pandemic. Want to know a little more about the group, and why it exists in the first place? You came to the right place. We're called GZERO, after all!

The G7 actually began as the G6, when the leaders of France, West Germany, the USA, Japan, the UK and Italy met in a Chateau outside of Paris to squabble their way out of an oil shock and financial crisis. They had so much fun they agreed to do it every year. They even let Canada join the party in 1976, making it the G7.

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Has Biden convinced the G7 “America is back”?

A look at US President Joe Biden's first trip abroad, which included a very important first stop at the G7 summit in the United Kingdom. Did he convince allies that "America is back" and ready to resume its leadership role in global affairs? And if so, does it even matter if Americans still need to be convinced that US engagement in the world is vital? In this episode of GZERO World with Ian Bremmer, former US Ambassador to NATO Ivo Daalder weighs in on Biden's performance and the way forward for the US and its closest friends.

What does “build back better” even mean (and can we do it)?

What does President Biden's "build back better" slogan really mean? Well, it implies the world before the pandemic already needed some fixing. In fact, it's kind of like "Make America Great Again." And there's a reason why those phrases hit home. A lot of people DO think the system is broken. But beyond catchy slogans, how do we actually fix it?

Watch the episode: Is modern society broken?

No-drama Joe Biden’s first 100 days: big wins, but challenges ahead

In his first 100 days, Biden has issued more executive orders than any president since FDR. 40 of them by mid-April. His administration exceeded (modestly set) goals for vaccine distribution, pushed a record $1.9 trillion stimulus plan through Congress, rejoined the Paris Climate Agreement and announced an end to the war in Afghanistan. Biden's approval rating of 53% at the 100-day milestone, though lower than those of Obama and Bush, is 12 points higher than Trump's was at this point. But there are clear signs the next several months will be a much bumpier ride, with challenges from immigration to healthcare to a deeply divided Congress.

Watch the episode: Make politics "boring" again: Joe Biden's first 100 Days

What's the verdict on Biden's first 100 days?

Ever since Franklin Delano Roosevelt promised to rescue the country from the Great Depression during his first 100 days in office, that timeframe has become a customary early benchmark to assess the performance of US presidents.

When Joe Biden took office on January 20, the country was mired in a Depression-like crisis caused by the COVID pandemic and associated economic fallout. So how well has he done during his first 100 days in office? Eurasia Group analyst Clayton Allen explains where Biden has performed best and where he's missed a few shots already.

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Crisis at the border a no-win scenario for Biden

As thousands of migrants, many of them children, attempt to cross the US southern border, stretching the immigration system's ability to process and integrate them, President Joe Biden now finds himself facing a challenge that has bedeviled presidents and Congress for decades: how to reform an immigration system that everyone agrees is broken, but which no one can agree on how to fix.

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Is the US misjudging the Middle East’s power shifts? Vali Nasr's view

"Pivot to Asia." It was the catchphrase floating around Washington DC's foreign policy circles in 2009 when President Obama first took office. And yet twelve years later, the Middle East continues to consume the attention of the United States' military and diplomatic efforts. Now President Biden is determined to change that, and to turn Washington's attention to Asia once and for all as he moves to confront a growing China. But according to Johns Hopkins University Middle East scholar Vali Nasr, President Biden's approach to the Middle East will have to adapt to the once-in-a-generation power grab occurring between Iran, Israel, and Turkey while Arab nations in the region increasingly lose influence.

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