Kushner: Palestine's Mahmoud Abbas is no 'great dealmaker or statesman'

White House senior advisor Jared Kushner, who masterminded the Trump administration's new Mideast peace proposal, had tough words for Mahmoud Abbas, the President of the Palestinian Authority, accusing him of being more interested in "flying around" the world than running his government efficiently for his people.


So, who is Mahmoud Abbas?

Abbas runs the Palestinian National Authority (PA), the semi-autonomous government based in Ramallah that manages local affairs in the Palestinian territories in the West Bank. He assumed this role in 2005 after the death of longtime leader Yasser Arafat. The 84-year old Abbas, known colloquially as Abu Mazen, is a veteran of Palestinian politics and peace negotiations: he accompanied Arafat to the White House to sign the Oslo Accords back in 1993.

Abbas has long pursued international recognition of Palestinian statehood. Palestine now has non-member state status at the UN, and in 2015, became a member of the International Criminal Court.

Abbas has firmly rejected the new US peace plan, which was written without input from Palestinian leaders, as "the slap of the century."

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Kevin Sneader, global managing partner of McKinsey & Company, answers the question: Are CEOs getting real about climate change?

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Welcome to the eleventh parliamentary elections in Iran's 40-year history.

Want to run for a seat? You can…if you're an Iranian citizen between the ages of 30 and 75, hold a master's degree or its equivalent, have finished your military service (if you're a man), and have demonstrated a commitment to Islam. Check all these boxes, and you can ask permission to run for office.

Permission comes from the 12-member Guardian Council, a body composed of six clerics appointed by Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and six jurists that Khamenei appoints indirectly. If the Council says yes, you can win a seat in parliament. If they say no, you can't.

This parliament, also called the Majlis, does have real power. It approves the national budget, drafts legislation and sends it to the Guardian Council for approval, ratifies treaties, approves ministers and can question the president. The current Majlis represents a wide range of values and opinions.

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As the head of a leading management consulting firm, global managing partner of McKinsey & Company Kevin Sneader has an inside view into the challenges facing the world's top executives. Every Thursday, Sneader will address questions about key issues like attracting and retaining talent, growing revenue, navigating change, staying ahead of the competition, and corporate responsibility – all in 60 seconds.

GZERO's Alex Kliment interviews New Yorker correspondent and author Joshua Yaffa. The two discuss Yaffa's new book, Between Two Fires, about what life is like for Russians today. They also sample some vodka at a famous Russian restaurant in NYC, of course!