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Armenia’s capital reels from the aftermath of Nagorno-Karabakh & Russia-Ukraine wars
Armenia’s capital reels from the aftermath of Nagorno-Karabakh & Russia-Ukraine wars | GZERO World

Armenia’s capital reels from the aftermath of Nagorno-Karabakh & Russia-Ukraine wars

Hundreds of thousands of people fleeing Nagorno-Karabakh and Russia’s Ukraine invasion have come to Armenia, where the future is uncertain.

In September, Azerbaijan launched a military offensive in the Armenian enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh, a mountainous region in the South Caucuses at the heart of a decades-long conflict between the two countries. Azerbaijan seized control of the territory in less than 48 hours, forcing hundreds of thousands of ethnic Karabakh Armenians to flee across the border. And they’re not the only ones. Since Russia launches its invasion of Ukraine, around a hundred thousand Russians have also fled into Armenia to escape conscription and sanctions.

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Ian Explains: 2023: A good year for warmongers
Ian Explains: 2023: A good year for warmongers | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Ian Explains: 2023: A good year for warmongers

2023 was a rough year for people who want peace in the world, whether it was the war in Ukraine, Gaza, or the one Americans seem to be fighting against each other.

Looking ahead to 2024, one phrase may be coming back to you: The wheels are coming off.

As Ian Bremmer explains, for years, he has been warning that our GZERO world – characterized by a lack of global leadership and the geopolitical conflict that grows as a consequence – was gathering speed. That acceleration is only increasing today while channels of international cooperation – multinational institutions, traditional alliances, and global supply chains – are losing their ability to absorb shock.

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Overlooked stories in 2023
Overlooked stories in 2023 | GZERO World with Ian Bremmer

Overlooked stories in 2023

In 2023, a war in Ukraine got worse and new one erupted in Gaza, but there also were many other stories that didn't capture the world's attention.

2023 has been a rough one, hasn't it? From a war in Ukraine that lurched into its third year with mere kilometers of territory traded on the battlefield to a new chapter in an old conflict in Gaza with no end in sight, it's enough to make a person want to dig a bunker in the backyard. Or at least get into yoga...

In this episode, Ian Bremmer takes stock of the state of the world in 2023. Be warned: no sugar shall be coating said thoughts! Then, we'll bring you a fascinating conversation with sociologist Zeynep Tufekci about the one thing everyone is overlooking in the AI conversation. Hint: it has nothing to do with Elon Musk (thank goodness!).

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AI explosion, elections, and wars: What to expect in 2024
AI explosion, elections, and wars: What to expect in 2024 | Ian Bremmer | World in :60

AI explosion, elections, and wars: What to expect in 2024

Ian Bremmer shares his insights on global politics this week on World In :60.

What are the global ramifications of Red Sea shipping disruptions?

This is a lot of ships that are carrying a lot of goods that can't go through the Red Sea because the Houthis are hitting them. And so instead they're going around the Cape of Good Hope, which is South Africa. It's a lot longer and it's more expensive. You know, it's not really an impact on the markets in the sense that the goods are still getting through. So it's not like you're not getting your oil, you're not getting your commodities. It is going to hurt the Egyptian economy significantly because they're not getting that transit and the fees. It would benefit South Africa, but their ports are a huge mess. So, I mean, funnily enough, it's probably a benefit for like Namibia and Mozambique and we'll see for how long It lasts.

Was 2023 a good year for Vladimir Putin?

On balance, I would say no. I mean, you know, he had his former chef and his confidant and his paramilitary supporter, you know, Prigozhin with the coup against him and ended up dead. So that's not great. And that was a lot of money that worked for the Kremlin. And also, he's got 11 rounds of sanctions against him and half of his sovereign assets frozen by the Americans, by the Europeans, by the entire developed world. And, of course, he also had a huge hit to his human capital with not only a whole bunch of men getting ground down in the fight, but also a lot of them leaving because they don't want to get caught up. So the last couple of months have been good in the sense that they're not losing territory that they've taken from Ukraine. And so he can spin anything as a win because he's a dictator. But things look horrible for Putin, irrespective of the nature of the fight with Russia-Ukraine.

As 2023 comes to a close, what are the biggest stories to look ahead at in 2024?

Well, I mean, of course, all these elections happening in so many parts of the world. I mean, in India, in the European Union, in the United States, in Russia, of course, which is going to be a real nail biter. Who knows what could happen there. And then you have incredible transition of explosion for artificial intelligence impacting the way all of us live. Massive upside opportunities, massive downside disruptions and governance desperately trying to catch up. Those seem to be some of the biggest things, not to mention the fact that we've got a bunch of big wars going on. And of course, the nature of the Chinese economy, a lot of stuff to focus on.

Ari Winkleman

What’s Nakhchivan, and could it spark yet another war in Europe?

OK, you may only recently have learned what “Nagorno-Karabakh” is (and if you didn’t, you can go here.) But when it rains it pours, especially in the Caucasus. So now it’s time to learn about a small exclave that could trigger the region’s next big conflict. Today, we are meeting “Nakhchivan.”

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Men and paramedic staff help transport a man who was injured in a blast in Mastung to a hospital in Quetta, Pakistan.

REUTERS/Stringer

Hard Numbers: Pakistan blast, mRNA Nobel win, Kaiser Permanente strike, escaping Nagorno-Karabakh, flights to Libya, cashing in rupees

59: Fifty-nine people were killed Saturday in a bomb blast at a mosque in Mastung, Pakistan, where people were gathering to mark the birthday of the Prophet Mohammad. Pakistan’s interior ministry accused India’s intelligence service of masterminding the attack, a charge Delhi denies.

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Kosovo-Serbia tensions worsen, hurting EU membership hopes
Kosovo-Serbia escalation | Europe In :60 | GZERO Media

Kosovo-Serbia tensions worsen, hurting EU membership hopes

Carl Bildt, former prime minister of Sweden, shares his perspective on European politics - this week from Stockholm.

Are Serbia and Kosovo heading towards a confrontation?

It looks very bad. What happened in northern Kosovo the other day was distinctly bad. A collection of fairly well-armed and well-organized Serb thugs did an operation that was eventually beaten back by Kosovo police. It follows a cycle of escalation that was initiated on the Kosovo side, has to be said, last year, and has not been brought under control by rather intense diplomacy, both by the Europeans and by the Americans. At the moment, things look very bleak. This, of course, is damaging the EU integration prospects for both Serbia and Kosovo. Let's see what happens.

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Refugees from Nagorno-Karabakh region ride in a truck upon their arrival at the border village of Kornidzor, Armenia, September 27, 2023.

REUTERS/Irakli Gedenidze

Hard Numbers: Armenians flee Nagorno-Karabakh, GOP debate falls flat, Evergrande stock drops, tragedy strikes Iraqi wedding, Commander strikes again

50,000: A torrent of at least 50,000 ethnic Armenians have fled Nagorno-Karabakh after Azerbaijani forces occupied the hotly contested enclave last week. The refugees constitute approximately one-third of the pre-war Armenian population. Among those fleeing was Russian-Armenian billionaire Ruben Vardanyan, who Azerbaijan’s border guard service said Wednesday it had arrested.

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