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Biden strikes Syria. Now what?

Ian Bremmer's Quick Take:

Hi, everybody. Ian Bremmer here, and as we head into the weekend, a Quick Take on, well, the first bombing campaign of the new Biden administration. You kind of knew it was going to happen. Against some Iranian-backed militias in Syria, looks like a couple of dozen, perhaps more killed, and some militia-connected military facilities destroyed. I think there are a few ways to look at this, maybe three different lenses.

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Myanmar military unlikely to back down; challenges for the new US ambassador to the UN

Ian Bremmer shares his perspective on global politics this week:

With protests growing, where does that leave the Myanmar coup?

Well, certainly no feeling on the part of the military that they need to back down under either domestic or international pressure. There's been relatively limited violence, thankfully so far. A few protesters have been killed. They've used tear gas, they've used water cannons, but much less of a crackdown than certainly they're capable of or that we've seen from the Myanmar military historically. That, of course, gives the protesters on the ground more incentive to think that they have success, and they can continue.

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The road ahead for US-Mexico relations

With a new American president in office, US-Mexico relations face a turning point. Can Mexico's populist leader Andrés Manuel López Obrador, also known as AMLO, forge the same bond with President Biden as he did with former President Trump? And how will that dynamic impact immigration reform in the US. These questions come at a critical time for Mexico, as it scrambles to regain control of rampant violence and a raging pandemic.

Watch the GZERO World episode: Can AMLO Live Up to Mexico's Critical Moment? Jorge Ramos Discusses

Texas grid shows need to fix infrastructure in US; RIP Rush Limbaugh

Ian Bremmer discusses the World In (more than) 60 Seconds:

What's happening in Texas?

Speaking of weird weather, my goodness yeah, I didn't know this was coming up here. Yeah, it's cold, right? There's snow. It looks horrible and millions of people without energy and of course that is because the level of infrastructure investment into the Texas grid is well below what it needs to be. There's a lack of integration. Texas' grid largely stands by itself. It is not under the authority of or coordinated multilaterally with broader energy infrastructure. And there has been a lot of investment into renewables in Texas. It is certainly true. They've been very interested in that. Sped up under former Governor Perry but still the vast majority of electricity is coming from fossil fuels. It's coming from coal and mostly oil and gas.

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Why Mexico’s president waited so long to congratulate President-elect Biden

Weeks after President-elect Biden was declared the winner of the 2020 US election, Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO for short) was one of the last world leaders to congratulate him. In fact, he waited until December, after the Electoral College certified its vote, to join Russian President Vladimir Putin and Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro in being some of the last world leaders to contact the President-elect. Acclaimed journalist and Univision news anchor Jorge Ramos explains why the Mexican leader waited so long and if the delayed felicitations bode ill for US-Mexico relations.

Watch the GZERO World episode: Can AMLO Live Up to Mexico's Critical Moment? Jorge Ramos Discusses

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